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Anti-Semitic Incidents, Coronavirus Information, Avast, More: Monday Afternoon ResearchBuzz, February 3, 2020

NEW RESOURCES

Cleveland Jewish News: ADL launches new online database to track anti-Semitic incidents in America. “The Anti-Defamation League just launched an online searchable database that helps track anti-Semitic incidents against Jews that have taken place throughout the United States. The ‘ADL Tracker’ will be regularly updated to provide the most recent information available on cases of anti-Semitic vandalism, harassment and assaults reported to or detected by the ADL.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

PLOS Blogs: Novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) outbreak. “The novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) outbreak is both saddening and concerning. The scientific community has come together rapidly to address this outbreak in an open and collaborative manner. As a publisher, we look to support the global response to this outbreak by sharing and amplifying research data and findings relevant to the outbreak…. Here is what we are doing…”

BetaNews: Avast apologizes for selling user data and shuts down its marketing analytics subsidiary Jumpshot with immediate effect. “Avast has been facing growing criticism following an investigation by Motherboard and PCMag that revealed the company’s free antivirus software was harvesting user data and selling it onto marketers.”

USEFUL STUFF

MakeUseOf: 5 Free Guides to Understand Digital Security and Protect Your Privacy . “With the number of data breaches, phishing attacks, and other digital threats facing us today, you need to know how to stay secure when using technology. Check these free online guides to understand digital security and protect your privacy.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Washington Post: It wasn’t just the National Archives. The Library of Congress also balked at a Women’s March photo.. “The Library of Congress abandoned plans last year to showcase a mural-size photograph of demonstrators at the 2017 Women’s March in Washington because of concerns it would be perceived as critical of President Trump, according to emails obtained by The Washington Post.”

New York Times: Why Random Government Accounts Are All Over Your Timeline. “Earlier this month… the San Antonio Water System, which regulates the water utilities for the Texas city, tweeted a joke about Baby Yoda reaching to flush the toilet. In October, the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer fired off a tweet about clogging a friend’s toilet using an image of the widely memed Cleveland Browns quarterback Baker Mayfield. The Department of Transportation in Northern Virginia used a GIF of a confused German shepherd to ask drivers to refrain from speeding.”

Tubefilter: China’s New Digital Stars Are Construction Vehicles–And They Have 40 Million Viewers. “The respiratory illness has sickened nearly 10,000 and killed 213, and with cases presenting in all areas of China, transportation across the country has been suspended, and people have been urged to isolate themselves in their homes to prevent further spread. Stuck there, they’ve been keeping themselves busy by tuning in to digital livestreams–which, obviously, isn’t so unusual. What is unusual is the subjects of these livestreams: two currently-under-construction hospitals, and the people and vehicles building them.”

SECURITY & LEGAL

TechCrunch: Ring’s new security ‘control center’ isn’t nearly enough. “On the same day that a Mississippi family is suing Amazon -owned smart camera maker Ring for not doing enough to prevent hackers from spying on their kids, the company has rolled out its previously announced ‘control center,’ which it hopes will make you forget about its verifiably ‘awful’ security practices.”

RESEARCH & OPINION

University of California Riverside: AAPI Data releases mapping tool for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. “[Karthick] Ramakrishnan, a professor of public policy and political science at the University of California, Riverside, directs the research initiative AAPI Data, a nationally recognized publisher of demographic data and policy research on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, or AAPIs. AAPI Data recently partnered with the the national membership organization Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders in Philanthropy, or AAPIP, to create and release a simple yet powerful mapping tool…. this digital tool is intended to help journalists, decision-makers, and community organizations better understand the diversity and geographic settlement patterns of AAPIs across the country.”

Gizmodo UK: Facebook’s ‘Clear History’ Tool Doesn’t Clear Shit. “By using this tool, you’re just telling Facebook to put the data it has on you into two separate buckets that are otherwise mixed together. Put another way, Facebook is offering a one-stop-shop to opt-out of any ties between the sites and services you peruse daily that have some sort of Facebook software installed and your own-platform activity on Facebook or Instagram. The only thing you’re clearing is a connection Facebook made between its data and the data it gets from third parties, not the data itself.” If you don’t like swearing, avoid this article — it’s saltier than condensed soup. Good afternoon, Internet…

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Simple Steps To Get Started on Your Ancestry® Family History Journey

October is Family History Month so there’s no better time to discover your own unique family story. Learning about your family history helps you better understand your past, including the triumphs and struggles your ancestors went through, and provides crucial context about who you are and where you came from. Plus, this is information you Read More

The post Simple Steps To Get Started on Your Ancestry® Family History Journey appeared first on Ancestry Blog.

“He wanted a free conversation with us”

After his fight with James Otis, Jr., became a big deal, Customs Commissioner John Robinson published his version of what had led up to it. That account was dated 7 Sept 1769 and appeared in Green and Russell’s Boston Post-Boy four days later.

According to Robinson, on Friday, 1 September, he arrived at the Board of Customs’s meeting room in Concert Hall about 10:30 A.M. and was told that Otis had come by that morning and asked to speak to him and a fellow Customs Commissioner, Henry Hulton. After Hulton came in, the two men sent “Green the Messenger”—probably Bartholomew Green—to find Otis.

About 11:00, Otis arrived at the door with Samuel Adams. The board’s secretary invited him in, but he declined. The two Commissioners went to the door, and Robinson said:

Your servant, Gentlemen; pray what is your business with us?—-

Mr. Otis answered, that he wanted a free conversation with us:

I replied, It is necessary that we should first know upon what business, Will you not walk into a room Gentlemen?

He answered, that his business was of such a nature, that it could not be transacted in our own houses, and he could not mention it until he met us: and he proposed, that each of us should bring with him a friend, and he would bring a friend with him.

I then asked him, whether his business was official?

He answered, he did not understand what I meant by official:

I replied, does it relate to us as Commissioners?

He said, it is related to his character, he wanted a free conversation with us on that subject, and that he was to meet Mr. [William] Burch [another Customs Commissioner] at the coffee-house the next morning at seven o’clock.

I answered, that as I lived in the country, I did not know whether I could attend at that time, and Mr. Hulton [who lived in Brookline] said the same in respect to himself.

Mr. Otis then said any other time will do.

We answered, we would see him at a convenient opportunity, and then parted.

I share that all to show the genteel, even arch, tone of the interaction, and to suggest how frustrating it must have been to figure out what Otis was on about. It’s notable that he didn’t have a particular beef with Robinson—he was making the same approach to three of the five Commissioners. (Of the remaining two, John Temple was a political ally of the Whigs and Charles Paxton a longtime foe, so Otis probably didn’t see approaching them as worthwhile.)

The next morning, Robinson decided he’d go to the coffee house at the same time as Burch, but he arrived late, closer to 7:30, and found Burch coming out. He and Otis ended up alone in a back room sharing a “dish of coffee.” [Because you need some kind of caffeine for a breakfast meeting.]

Finally Otis got to his grievance. In Robinson’s recollection he said:

I am informed that I have been represented to government by your Board, as a rebel and a traitor, and I have two or three questions to put to you, that I think, as a gentleman, I have a right to an answer, or at least to ask. The first is, whether your Board as Commissioners, Gentlemen, or in any other manner, ever represented me in that light, in any of their memorials or letters to the Treasury.

There had been another leak from London, and Otis was taking things personally.

TOMORROW: The Customs Commissioners’ reports.

Online genealogy research to understand family history and ancestry

Life is lived onwards but understood backwards. Indeed, there are lot of things to learn in history, more so, with the people for whom you own your heritage. Those people whom youve never ever heard of, the forgotten souls of your great, great, great, great grandparents were the reason why you are on earth right now. Because of this, many peoples interests were captured on studying their own roots, their genealogy.

Over the years, the supreme records that serve as the best research tools on the study of genealogy are held in microfilm reels. The members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints were the major collectors of family trees as part of their religion and belief. Because of this, most family researchers seek for their help in tracing their line of ancestors.

Aside from the records of the Mormons, there also other excellent sources to find names of the people. One of which is the newspaper. Newspapers can contain articles about or obituaries of your relatives who lived decades ago. Funeral cards are also powerful tools for researchers. These could be found from the closets of your parents or libraries. Also, you can interview your living relatives about the names of your ancestors, their stories, and their way of living during the time. Nevertheless, all these sum up to the laborious chore of studying your genealogy. And to add to the difficulty is the financial concern. The old methods of tracing the family genealogy are undoubtedly expensive. Tracing the genealogy requires an investment. The introduction of internet to the world of genealogy is a great technological spec.

Because of the online genealogy system, all the records and files from the primary documents, to newspaper articles and obituaries down to the funeral cards were all embedded to the vast sea of knowledge. This online system allows the researchers to an easy access to the resources. All the capabilities and authentications of the recorded documents are posted at the internet. And everyday, more sets of information are entered to the web to keep its record updated and reliable.

There are free genealogy search engines that require only certain information such as surname, name, and/or location of your ancestry. In an instant, you can readily find your line of ancestry. However, if you are not satisfied with the results reported by search engines, you can conduct further study of your genealogy. To help you in this quest, you can post at the online message board the specific surname that you are tracing. In this manner, you will be able to meet fellow genealogists who are working on the same surname.

For genealogists, the online research for resources is beneficial. It helps cut the cost of expenses and the time allotted for genealogy research. Aside from this, they can share their documents with other researchers online. The exchange of information speeds up the tracking of heritage.

While you seek to learn more about many things, dont you think it is also fulfilling to know your roots?