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Findmypast Launch Vast New Photographic Collection in Celebration of VE Day 2020

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

    • Findmypast publish new online photographic archive in partnership with the UK’s largest news publisher Reach plc
    • Over 10,000 original images from WWII, many which have never been published before, will offer vivid new insights into a nation at war
    • The Findmypast Photo collection will scale over the coming years to include millions of images taken between 1904 – 2000, covering all aspects of British life ranging from sports, education, places of work and daily life to politics, national and local events
    • The collection is now available for anyone to search for free from May 8th to May 15th, in celebration of VE Day 2020

Leading family history website, Findmypast, has announced the launch of a ground-breaking new project in partnership with Reach plc. 

Digitised and published online for the first time as a complete standalone collection in celebration of VE Day 2020, the Findmypast Photo collection is made up of more than 10,000 original images from Reach’s archives. Managed through Reach PLC’s content licensing agency, Mirrorpix, this huge vault of press photography dates from the earliest years of the 20th Century up to the present day and is one of most significant photographic records of British history in the world.

A van-load of beer passing through Piccadilly Circus. The expression of some of the men sitting on top suggest they have tasted a drop. 8 May 1945.

The collection consists of original images from press photographers who documented the 1939-45 conflict at home and overseas for nine national and regional titles, including the Daily Mirror, Scottish Daily Record, Manchester Evening News and Liverpool Echo during the years of the Second World War.

Many of these images have never before been published, providing new opportunities to explore how families and communities experienced the war. Original image descriptions created by the photographers still survive and much of this information has been indexed and made fully searchable on Findmypast. This enables users to bring the past to life with ease, speed and accuracy by searching thousands of images by keyword, date, and location as well as by category, such as the Armed forces, World War 2, Evacuees, Home Front, Sport, Life Events, Work or Schools.

Interest in online family history continues to grow and there are now more tools and resources for tracing ancestors than ever before. Despite this, discovering images relevant to an individual’s family tree remains challenging with very few resources available online.

Findmypast and Reach PLC aim to change this by providing public access to these never before seen photographs. The Daily Mirror built its brand on being Britain’s daily photographic journal and has been documenting the nation’s social history for over 100 years. Now, for the first time, anyone can step back through time to see people, places and events as they were more than 70 years ago.

In digitising this valuable photographic record and making it available to the public, Findmypast and Mirrorpix are not only expanding the nation’s understanding and interpretation of historical events, but also conserving them for future generations.

Today’s release forms the first phase of a vast collection that will continue to grow as Findmypast and Reach publish additional material covering a wide variety of dates, locations and themes. In time, the Findmypast Photo collection will expand in scope and scale to include millions of images taken between 1904 – 2000, covering all aspects of British Life ranging from sports, education, places of work and daily life to politics, national and local events.

Tamsin Todd, CEO of Findmypast said: “Findmypast’s mission is to help as many people as possible to discover how they’re uniquely connected, not only to each other but also to defining moments from our history. The 75th anniversary of V.E Day is a momentous occasion that will inspire many to question their own connections to the defining moments of history. Genealogy allows anyone to personalise the past, and in providing access to these valuable never before seen images, we look forward to helping users create more magical moments of discovery that can shape their futures and add greater meaning to the connections they make. 

Jim Mullen, CEO of Reach plc said: “Every minute of every day, our newsbrands are serving hundreds of communities across the UK, publishing the news that matters to them, their friends and their families. Every single one of those communities has multiple deep connections to the story of VE Day and the years leading directly up to it. Our newsbrands covered those events as they happened and by publishing our VE Day collections with FMP today we’re able to share those stories once again, re-connecting people to their own family history. Stories that perhaps they had forgotten or maybe never even knew, until now.

Speaking from personal experience I can say that any journey to the Reach archives is a wonderful adventure into the past. Our collections are home to tales of the people, places and events – great and small – that shaped modern Britain. Those tales are just waiting to be discovered and Reach are delighted that from now on we can share that adventure with all of you.

The Findmypast photo collection is completely free to search and explore from May 8th to May 15th. To learn about the collection and what it contains, please visit: https://www.findmypast.com/page/vintage-photo-collection

Encouraging Professional Researchers to be the Best

The following announcement was written by the Association of Genealogists and Researchers in Archives:

The Association of Genealogists and Researchers in Archives (AGRA) is organising an event for professional genealogists encouraging them to join the Association. It will take place at the St George’s Centre in Leeds on March 16 March 2020.

AGRA is the largest professional organisation of accredited members in the UK and we promote high professional standards in the field of genealogy and historical research. AGRA also acts as a representative voice in matters relating to genealogy.

AGRA is looking to encourage other paid researchers to join. Members are generally acknowledged to be the best in their field.

The event will include guidance on how to successfully run a professional genealogy practice and marketing, from members who have successfully run a business for many years. Other members will explain the advantages of joining the Association.

The event costs £15 and includes lunch. The entry fee will be deducted from the first year’s AGRA subscription for anyone attending this event who goes on to make a successful application to join the Association.

Bookings will close on Thursday 27 February.

For more details and a link to the booking form, please see https://www.agra.org.uk/event-network-day-for-professional-genealogists-2020-03-16.

Colour Tithe Maps for Warwickshire added to TheGenealogist

The following announcement was written by the folks at TheGenealogist:

TheGenealogist has just released additional sets of Colour Tithe Maps to join the previously available greyscale maps in their National Tithe Records collection. This release for Warwickshire is of high-resolution colour digitised maps which will provide the family historian with highly detailed maps sourced from both The National Archives as well as the Warwick County Record Office.

Researchers searching for owners or occupiers of Warwickshire land surveyed in the 19th century for the Tithe Commutation Act 1836 now have a choice of plans linked to the fully searchable apportionment schedules. Subscribers to TheGenealogist’s Diamond membership can select to view The National Archives’ grayscale maps, The National Archives’ colour map, or the Warwickshire Record Office colour maps when using the Tithe & Landowner records for this county. The Warwickshire Record Office maps are, in many cases, less faded and more vibrant in their colours having had less wear and tear than the alternatives.

Colour Tithe Map of Wasperton, Warwickshire

The new data includes colour tithe maps showing plots of land covering the years from 1837 to 1855 with some much later plans where there was an altered apportionment recorded.

These tagged colour maps join the previously released apportionment record books, national greyscale maps and colour maps for Rutland, Huntingdonshire, Buckinghamshire, City of York, Middlesex, Northumberland, Surrey, Westmorland, and the North and East Ridings of Yorkshire.
The National Tithe Records collection gives the family history researcher the ability to search by name and keyword (for example parish or county) to look for all levels of society from large estate owners to occupiers of tiny plots such as a cottage or a cowshed.

Read the article, Warwickshire Colour Tithe Records discovers the house that went to America, at:
https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/2019/warwickshire-colour-tithe-records-discovers-the-house-that-went-to-america-1198/

About TheGenealogist

TheGenealogist is an award-winning online family history website, who put a wealth of information at the fingertips of family historians. Their approach is to bring hard to use physical records to life online with easy to use interfaces such as their Tithe and newly released Lloyd George Domesday collections.

TheGenealogist’s innovative SmartSearch technology links records together to help you find your ancestors more easily. TheGenealogist is one of the leading providers of online family history records. Along with the standard Birth, Marriage, Death and Census records, they also have significant collections of Parish and Nonconformist records, PCC Will Records, Irish Records, Military records, Occupations, Newspaper record collections amongst many others.

TheGenealogist uses the latest technology to help you bring your family history to life. Use TheGenealogist to find your ancestors today!

About The National Archives

The National Archives is one of the world’s most valuable resources for research and an independent research organisation in its own right. As the official archive and publisher for the UK government, and England and Wales they are the guardians of some of the UK’s most iconic national documents, dating back over 1,000 years. Their role is to collect and secure the future of the government record, both digital and physical, to preserve it for generations to come, and to make it as accessible and available as possible.

The National Archives brings together the skills and specialisms needed to conserve some of the oldest historic documents as well as leading digital archive practices to manage and preserve government information past, present and future.
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ http://www.legislation.gov.uk/

After Malcom X, Facebook, DNA Databases, More: Friday Afternoon ResearchBuzz, February 22, 2019

NEW RESOURCES

CAIR: CAIR Research Director Launches ‘After Malcolm Digital Archive’ with George Mason University. “The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), the nation’s largest Muslim civil rights and advocacy organization, today announced that CAIR National Director of Research and Advocacy Dr. Abbas Barzegar has launched the ‘After Malcolm Digital Archive’ with George Mason University’s Ali Vural Ak Center for Global Islamic Studies.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

CNET: Mark Zuckerberg to meet with UK culture chief after ‘digital gangsters’ report. “Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is set to meet with UK Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright at the company’s California headquarters on Thursday afternoon. [Yesterday – TJC] The meeting comes just days after a British government report slammed Facebook and other companies for ‘considering themselves to be ahead of and beyond the law’ and accused Zuckerberg of ‘contempt’ for the UK. ”

AZCentral: Controversial DNA database bill scaled back to patient care professionals only. “A controversial bill that would have created a massive statewide database of DNA from a myriad of professionals, volunteers and even dead people has been scaled back. Sen. David Livingston, R-Peoria, the bill sponsor, has introduced an amendment to Senate Bill 1475 that would require DNA only from professionals who care for patients with intellectual disabilities in an intermediate care facility.”

USEFUL STUFF

Make Tech Easier: 5 Chrome Extensions to Speed Up Your Browsing. “Chrome is known as the fastest browser, but for some people even fastest isn’t enough. Moreover, Chrome is also a huge memory hog and may lead to a slower browsing experience on low-end devices. Thankfully, there are many Chrome extensions available that will speed things up for you exponentially.”

MakeUseOf: How to Find Videos on Facebook. “It isn’t always easy to find what you’re looking for on Facebook. Confusing menu items and poor search results hide some of the stuff worth looking at. Videos are one of the biggest victims. With that in mind, here’s how to find videos on Facebook.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

University of Michigan: Historical Letters In U-M Zoology Museum Archive Highlight Links Between Specimen Collection, Conservation . “Clark Schmutz spent more than 100 hours last semester reading and digitally scanning hundreds of letters in the correspondence files of the University of Michigan Museum of Zoology’s mammal collections, which date back to the 1800s. The scanning project is a multiyear effort to make the museum’s correspondence files available online. For Schmutz, who graduated in December with a double major in English and ecology, evolution and biodiversity, it was also an opportunity to search for intriguing stories that illustrate the links between museum collections and conservation.”

Independent (Ireland): Rodin statue outside Nando’s among first to feature in new database. “A statue of Eve by Auguste Rodin that sits outside a Nando’s restaurant in Harlow is one of the first to be included in a new database of publicly owned sculptures in the UK. Charitable organisation Art UK is working on what they say is the largest sculpture cataloguing project ever undertaken in the UK. They endeavour to have listed an estimated 150,000 pieces online by 2020.”

Mashable: Restoration YouTube will bring you deep into an internet rabbit hole. “The restoration community is a corner of YouTube boasting thousands of subscribers and millions of views. For the most part, it breaks down into four major subdivisions: shoes, swords and knives, small machinery, and toy restoration. Surprisingly, though, while all of these items are different, most of the content creators all had similar things to say.” The art restoration is pretty terrific too. Check out Baumgartner Restoration’s YouTube channel.

SECURITY & LEGAL

ZDNet: Adobe sends out second fix for critical Reader data leak vulnerability. “Adobe has released a second patch to resolve a critical zero-day vulnerability in Adobe Reader after its original fix failed. The vulnerability, CVE-2019-7089, was patched in Adobe’s February 12 patch release. Buried among 42 other critical bugs, the security flaw was described as a sensitive data leak problem which can lead to information disclosure when exploited.”

RESEARCH & OPINION

NewsCentral24x7: How a Script-Agnostic Media Can Empower The Illiterate. “In such an English-dominating virtual world, where technology, too, is largely developed and designed by native English-speaking persons, how do the oral or illiterate communities become a part? There is no denying that with the help of basic digital tools, people can be empowered to tell their own stories, beating long-set information exchange criterion of being able to read and write one or more script. By using the medium of spoken words and audio-visual story-telling, masses are better placed in the current information economy.” Good afternoon, Internet…

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