My Kindle Books

  • www.amazon.com
  • www.amazon.com
  • www.amazon.com
  • www.amazon.com
  • www.amazon.com

Inside Google Alphabet

Pain Pills, Neil Armstrong’s Spacesuit, Emoji, More: Wednesday Afternoon ResearchBuzz, July 17, 2019

Hey y’all! The latest Inside Google & Alphabet newsletter is available at https://inside.com/campaigns/inside-google-alphabet-2019-07-17-15985 . Today’s topics include yesterday’s hearings in Congress, expanded bike-sharing information on Google Maps, an upcoming AMA for Google Stadia, and more! Remember, the newsletter comes out every weekday excepting holidays and it’s free. Sign up here: https://inside.com/google

NEW RESOURCES

Washington Post: Drilling into the DEA’s pain pill database. “For the first time, a database maintained by the Drug Enforcement Administration that tracks the path of every single pain pill sold in the United States — by manufacturers and distributors to pharmacies in every town and city — is being made public.”

Smithsonian: Neil Armstrong’s Spacesuit On Display at National Air and Space Museum for 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11. “The effort to protect and display Armstrong’s suit also included sharing it with a wider audience. The museum and the Smithsonian’s Digitization Program Office 3-D scanned the suit, helmet and gloves. Through laser-arm scanning, structured light, photogrammetry and medical CT scanning, anyone in the world with an internet connection can now peek inside the suit and take a guided tour of its many complex components. The team has also made the data available so the public can download the high-resolution 3-D model for use in AR/VR platforms, animation software and 3-D printing.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

CNET: Emoji for falafel, service dogs and sloths are finally here. “Apple and Google both unveiled dozens of new emoji ahead of World Emoji Day on Wednesday. They include animals like a flamingo, orangutan and sloth, as well as foods such as waffles, falafel and garlic.”

USEFUL STUFF

Fast Company: This next-level Google Calendar hack lets you focus on what matters. “I’m happy to report that it’s actually quite simple to split up your Google Calendar events in a way that reflects the messy, multifaceted nature of your life and makes it possible to focus only on the items relevant to you at any particular point in time. Here’s how.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Ohio University: Ohio University Libraries awarded grant to develop Southeast Asia Digital Library. “Ohio University Libraries has been awarded a $1.2 million grant to develop the Southeast Asia Digital Library in collaboration with 14 other institutions. The five-year grant was awarded by the Henry Luce Foundation. The project will update the Southeast Asia Digital Library with a new generation of digital initiatives and expand its collection of materials to further enhance studies of Southeast Asia, including language program support.”

Vietnam+: Experts want digital archive for ceremonial singing. “Folk music researchers support the creation of a digital archive of ca tru (ceremonial singing) owned by a State-run agency to preserve the traditional art form and gather scattered materials owned by individual artists and researchers.”

Dublin Live: Dubliner Gemma O’Doherty’s YouTube channels removed after ‘repeat’ violations of Google-owned video site’s terms of service. “Controversial investigative journalist Gemma O’Doherty’s Youtube channels have been removed following what the company describes as “repeat” violations of its terms of service…. The failed European election candidate was live streaming on the site from outside Google’s headquarters in Dublin, which owns YouTube, this afternoon and on Facebook this evening.”

SECURITY & LEGAL

Courthouse News: Class Claims AT&T Sold Their Real-Time Locations to Bounty Hunters. “Despite assurances to the contrary, AT&T has been selling its customers’ location data to creditors, bounty hunters, landlords, prison officials, and all sorts of third parties, according to data privacy watchdog Electronic Frontier Foundation in a federal class action filed Tuesday.”

RESEARCH & OPINION

EurekAlert: A new tool for data scientists and biologists and more. “A new computational tool developed in the lab of USC Viterbi School Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering professor Paul Bodgan in collaboration with Ming Hsieh professor Edmond Jonckheere, is able to quickly identify the hidden affiliations and interrelationships among groups/items/persons with greater accuracy than existing tools.”

Mashable: Can VR help treat schizophrenia? Researchers launch trial with more than 400 patients . “A major clinical trial for mental health treatment just kicked off in the UK — and it involves virtual reality. Organized by VR therapy outfit gameChange, the government-funded program seeks to find out if VR can help people affected by schizophrenia and other mental health conditions.” Good afternoon, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

WWII Photography, Teaching FOIA, Photobucket, More: Monday Afternoon ResearchBuzz, June 24, 2019

Hey y’all! The latest Inside Google & Alphabet newsletter is available at https://inside.com/campaigns/inside-google-alphabet-2019-06-24-15324 . Today’s topics include a new Google investigation in Brazil, rumblings from Australia’s ACCC, Google Play malware, and more! Remember, the newsletter comes out every weekday excepting holidays and it’s free. Sign up here: https://inside.com/google

NEW RESOURCES

WRAL: North Carolina native’s World War II photos digitized. “The State Archives of North Carolina has honored Wilson native Guy Cox by digitizing more than 400 photographs the lensman took aboard the USS Bunker Hill from 1943-45 during World War II.” These are more “candid,” daily life, and portrait photography than military conflict photography, but it’s worth a visit. At least one photo has some (nothing-visible) nudity.

Muckrock: Looking for a better way to teach public records? Read what we’ve learned in Make FOIA Work. “Last August, with support from the Online News Association, we partnered with the Engagement Lab at Emerson College and the Boston Institute for Nonprofit Journalism to explore new ways of teaching public records to students and the broader community. Five workshops, four articles, and a hundred public records requests later, our partners at the Engagement Lab have put together a new website, Make FOIA Work, and downloadable guide on what we’ve learned, ideas to make Freedom of Information work more exciting and accessible, and a blueprint for others to build on.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

The Verge: Photobucket still has your photos, and it wants you to come back. “The company is trying to make a comeback as more than just a site for forgotten photos, though usage has dramatically declined over the years, and it faces significantly more competition than when it first launched in 2003. Once accounting for 2 percent of US internet traffic by hosting photos for sites like eBay and Myspace, Photobucket is now somewhere in the range of the 1,500th most-visited website in the US, according to Alexa rankings.”

Coin Rivet: Everipedia 2.0 launches public beta . “Everipedia – the world’s first encyclopedia built on blockchain technology – has officially rolled out the Everipedia 2.0 public beta.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

RTE: BAI wants to combat harmful content on social media. “The Broadcasting Authority of Ireland is proposing it be given the power to issue notices to remove harmful content, develop an online safety code and to promote awareness of online safety in Ireland.”

The New York Times: In Streaming Age, Classical Music Gets Lost in the Metadata. “When Roopa Kalyanaraman Marcello, a classical music aficionado in Brooklyn, asked her Amazon Echo for some music recently, she had a specific request: the third movement of Beethoven’s ‘Emperor’ Concerto. ‘It kind of energizes me, motivates me to get things done,’ she said. But the Echo, a voice-activated speaker, could not find what she wanted.”

UPI: Cannabis-related companies hit brick wall on social media. “Cannabis and industrial hemp companies that are legal in many states are finding an uneven terrain online when they attempt to promote their businesses or sell products on the Internet.”

SECURITY & LEGAL

BBC: Raspberry Pi used to steal data from Nasa lab. “A tiny Raspberry Pi computer has been used to steal data from Nasa’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the space agency has revealed. An audit report reveals the gadget was used to take about 500MB of data.”

Broadcasting+Cable: Sens. Warner, Hawley Team on Social Media Data Monetization Dashboard. “Sens. Mark Warner (D-Va.) and Josh Hawley (R-Mo.) have teamed up to introduce a bill that would require social media platforms and other ‘data harvesting companies’ to provide information to financial regulators and consumers on ‘exactly’ what data they are collecting from consumers and how it is being monetized, and charge the Securities and Exchange Commission to come up with a method for calculating data value.”

RESEARCH & OPINION

Bloomberg: What Social Media Needs Is More Humans. “Rare is the week that doesn’t bring some new controversy over someone or something being banned from Twitter or Facebook for being too offensive. (Latest: a Led Zeppelin album cover.) As regular readers know, I prefer more speech to less speech, but this column isn’t about what content rules private companies should enforce. Today I’m wearing my fair-process hat. These mighty controversies over kicking users off social media would be mightily reduced if there was a better process for making the decisions. And I have one. I can summarize my proposal this way: Human at the front end, human in the middle, human at the back end.” Good afternoon, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

Twitter, Amazon Alexa, GameBender, More: Thursday Afternoon ResearchBuzz, May 30, 2019

Hey y’all! The latest Inside Google & Alphabet newsletter is available at https://inside.com/campaigns/inside-google-alphabet-2019-05-30-14665 . Today’s topics include YouTube’s trending videos, Google Play, and a Throwback Thursday to Google Wave! Remember, the newsletter comes out every weekday excepting holidays and it’s free. Sign up here: https://inside.com/google

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

The Verge: Twitter is looking to hire a ‘master in the art of Twitter’ to become its Tweeter in Chief. “In the age of brands engaging in disturbing levels of personified intimacy with users on social media to package and sell mental illness or fashion consumption as a radical act of self-expression, Twitter itself is realizing that it needs some of the same marketing magic its platform has gifted fast food brands. streaming services, and cookie companies. That or Twitter wants its own Wendy’s chicken nugget or Instagram record-breaking egg moment.” When a pulled quote just makes you go uuuuugh.

CNET: Amazon’s new Alexa features puts added emphasis on privacy. “Privacy has become a much bigger concern for consumers and Amazon appears to be paying attention. The tech giant on Wednesday said it made it easier for users to delete their Alexa voice recordings.”

Santa Cruz Sentinel: GameBender teaches children how to code while gaming. “Instead of watching a TV show passively on the couch, children can now make changes as they watch and learn how to code, thanks to GameBender. The education startup, created by the makers of Makey Makey, will release its first gaming system Wednesday. Headquartered in Cocoa Beach, Florida, GameBender gives children the ability to make edits to characters and their actions on video games, science apps and DIY TV shows from the visual programming language nonprofit Scratch.”

USEFUL STUFF

KnowTechie: 7 of the smartest AI-apps I’ve used so far. Apparently a guest post, but a fun guest post. “Nowadays, there are plenty of apps that you can download at home onto your smartphone to see just how far AI has come. Not sure where to look? Here are 7 of the smartest AI-apps I’ve used so far.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Slate: Donald Trump’s Wikipedia Entry Is a War Zone. “On July 16, 2018, Democrats, Republicans, and the media were reeling from the U.S.-Russia summit in Helsinki. President Donald Trump had announced before the entire world that he didn’t ‘see any reason why’ Russia would have interfered in the 2016 election, despite mountains of evidence to the contrary gathered by the intelligence community…. Wikipedia editors, meanwhile, were split over whether the summit was momentous enough to include on Donald Trump’s page, one of the site’s most contentious areas.” The headline might have given you the idea that this is one of those incendiary articles. It’s not. It’s a deep dive with an interesting look at Wikipedia’s editing mechanisms and culture.

WRAL: Many items in Rhode Island’s archives are at risk of damage. “Many items in the Rhode Island archives, including the state’s copy of the Bill of Rights, are at risk of damage because they’re kept in a building that’s not meant for preserving rare, historic documents, according to an assessment released Tuesday.”

NBC News: Did the Iranians create fake U.S. social media accounts and pose as GOP politicians?. “Starting in April 2018, a group of anonymous people created fake American social media accounts to pose as journalists, plant letters to newspapers and impersonate Republican candidates for Congress — all in an apparent effort to promote Iranian interests. Was this the work of an Iranian intelligence service? A third country? A band of pranksters?”

SECURITY & LEGAL

United States Army: CID warns Army community about social media impersonation of Soldier accounts. “U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command’s (CID) Computer Crime Investigative Unit (CCIU) is once again warning Soldiers and the Army community to be on the lookout for ‘social media scams’ where cybercriminals impersonate service members by using actual and fictitious information, not just for ‘trust-based relationship scams,’ also known as romance scams, but for other impersonation crimes such as sales schemes and advance fee schemes.”

India Times: Andhra Pradesh agriculture ministry site exposed Aadhaar data of farmers. “Aadhaar numbers of thousands of farmers in Andhra Pradesh have been leaked, with the state’s agriculture ministry exposing the details through an open database on its website. A French security researcher who goes by the Twitter name Elliot Alderson and @fs0c131y Twitter handle, first discovered the data breach on Tuesday.”

RESEARCH & OPINION

Wired: To Fight Deepfakes, Researchers Built a Smarter Camera. “One of the most difficult things about detecting manipulated photos, or ‘deepfakes,’ is that digital photo files aren’t coded to be tamper-evident. But researchers from New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering are starting to develop strategies that make it easier to tell if a photo has been altered, opening up a potential new front in the war on fakery.”

SecurityWeek: Research Shows Twitter Manipulation in Weeks Before EU Elections. “This is an age of large scale political social engineering through social media, both by advertising and the presentation of misleading data. International social engineering became frontpage news with the 2016 US presidential elections, but has not abated since. Researchers with the Sherpa project analyzed the use of social media as a recommendation system — specifically Twitter — ahead of the European elections in May 2019.” Good afternoon, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!

EU Elections, Baidu, Fake News, More: Friday Afternoon ResearchBuzz, May 17, 2019

Hey y’all! The latest Inside Google & Alphabet newsletter is available at https://inside.com/campaigns/inside-google-alphabet-2019-05-17-14327 . Remember, the newsletter comes out every weekday excepting holidays and it’s free! Sign up here: https://inside.com/google

NEW RESOURCES

European Interest: Votul Meu: A new tool lunched in Romania. “The Center for the Study of Democracy in Romania has launched the independent vote matching tool, Votul Meu, ahead of the European elections. The interactive tool aims to match political preferences between parties and potential voters for the European elections, based on political parties’ campaign messages.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

Washington Post: White House declines to back Christchurch call to stamp out online extremism amid free speech concerns. “The United States broke with 18 governments and five top American tech firms Wednesday by declining to endorse a New Zealand-led effort to curb extremism online, a response to the live-streamed shootings at two Christchurch mosques that killed 51. White House officials said free-speech concerns prevented them from formally signing onto the largest campaign to date targeting extremism online. But it was another example of the United States standing at odds to some its closest allies.”

Reuters: Baidu swings to net loss for first time since listing, shares fall. “Chinese search engine operator Baidu Inc booked its first quarterly loss since at listing in 2005 and forecast quarterly revenue below market estimates, saying a ‘challenging marketing environment’ is sapping income from advertisers.”

The Moscow Times: Russia to Set Up ‘Fake News Database’. “Alexander Zharov’s regulatory agency, known by the acronym Roskomnadzor, has successfully blocked LinkedIn in Russia and is currently engaged in a yearlong battle to ban access to the popular Telegram messaging app. Roskomnadzor has also ordered news websites to delete content under a Russian law that bans ‘blatant disrespect’ toward the authorities.”

USEFUL STUFF

Make Tech Easier: How to Create a Useful Daily Digest List with Google Assistant. “On its own, Google Assistant has an incredible amount of features that make your life more functional, but when you pair it with other programs, you increase its value exponentially. And that’s what we’re going to do here, provide those who are just a bit scattered with an even better way to make sure we accomplish those tasks.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

Stuff NZ: Online advertising: NZ Government spends millions with Facebook, Google and other social media platforms. “Government departments have invested hundreds of millions in advertising on social media platforms in the past five years in order to reach the precise and captive audiences offered only in those online spaces. However, the ethics of public bodies capitalising on the algorithmic models offered by the likes of Facebook and Google is being called into question in a post-Christchurch terror attack world.”

Huffington Post: Bureau Of Land Management Scrubs Stewardship Language From News Releases . “The Bureau of Land Management, the federal agency that oversees more than 245 million acres of public land, has stripped its conservation-focused mission statement from agency news releases.”

The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy: “So You Want to Build a Digital Archive?” A Dialogue on Critical Digital Humanities Graduate Pedagogy. “This article presents conversations between an Assistant Professor and graduate student as they negotiate various methods and approaches to designing a digital archive. The authors describe their processes for deciding to develop a digital archive of street art in Kathmandu, Nepal through an anticolonial, feminist perspective that highlights community knowledge-making practices while also leveraging the affordances of digital representation. Written in the style of a dialogue, this article illustrates the various tensions and negotiations that interdisciplinary student-instructor teams may encounter when deciding how to design a digital archive through critical frameworks.”

RESEARCH & OPINION

The Verge: AI translation boosted eBay sales more than 10 percent. “We often hear that artificial intelligence is important for economic growth, and while that claim makes intuitive sense, there isn’t a lot of hard data to back it up. A recent study from economists at MIT and Washington University in St. Louis offers some proof, though, showing how AI tools boost trade by allowing sellers to cross the language barrier.”

Ars Technica: No, someone hasn’t cracked the code of the mysterious Voynich manuscript. “There are so many competing theories about what the Voynich manuscript is—most likely a compendium of herbal remedies and astrological readings, based on the bits reliably decoded thus far—and so many claims to have deciphered the text, that it’s practically its own subfield of medieval studies. Both professional and amateur cryptographers (including codebreakers in both World Wars) have pored over the text, hoping to crack the puzzle.” Good afternoon, Internet…

Do you like ResearchBuzz? Does it help you out? Please consider supporting it on Patreon. Not interested in commitment? Perhaps you’d buy me an iced tea. I love your comments, I love your site suggestions, and I love you. Feel free to comment on the blog, or @ResearchBuzz on Twitter. Thanks!