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DNA

Genealogy News Bytes – 16 July 2019


Some of the genealogy news and education items across my desktop the last four days include:

1)  News Articles:


Announcing the Polish Genealogy Conference 2019


*  Announcement – Laura G. Prescott Scholarship Winners

*  Vivid-Pix Announces Adding Metadata Zoom/Transcribe Feature to its RESTORE Software


2)  New or Updated Record Collections:

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar – Wednesday, 17 July, 11 a.m.:  Research Your Newfoundland Ancestors, by Tessa Keough

*  Upcoming SCGS Webinar — Wednesday, 17 July, 6 p.m. PDT:  More Power: Genetic Genealogy Apps and Extensions, by Shannon Christmas

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  Lesser Used Records for Research in the Netherlands, by Yvette Hoitink

4)  Genealogy Education – Podcasts:

*  Fisher’s Top Tips:  #88 — Write Your Story


*  Extreme Genes:  Episode 290 – The Georgetown Memory Project / Lambert On Researching Revolutionary Ancestors

*  Research Like a Pro:  RLP 53 – U.S. Homestead Records

5)  Genealogy Videos (YouTube):


6)  Genealogy Bargains:



7)  DNA Success Stories:


8)  Did you miss the last Genealogy News Bytes – 12 July 2019?

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Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the “Comments” link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

MyHeritage Expands to Health; Launches New DNA Test Offering Powerful and Personalized Health Insights for Consumers

MyHeritage today announced the MyHeritage DNA Health + Ancestry test, a major expansion of its DNA product line. The following is the announcement:

The new MyHeritage DNA Health + Ancestry test provides comprehensive health reports for conditions affected by genetics including heart disease, breast cancer, type 2 diabetes, and Alzheimer’s disease

Tel Aviv, Israel & Lehi, Utah — MyHeritage, the leading global service for family history and DNA testing, announced today a major expansion of its DNA product line with the launch of the MyHeritage DNA Health + Ancestry test. The test provides a new dimension of genetic insight with comprehensive health reports that can empower future health and lifestyle choices. It is a superset of the current MyHeritage DNA Ancestry-Only test, and includes its pillar features: a percentage breakdown of ethnic origins and matching to relatives through shared DNA. MyHeritage is now the only global consumer DNA company to offer an extensive health and ancestry product in over 40 languages.

The launch of the Health + Ancestry product distinguishes MyHeritage as the only major service that bridges consumers’ past, present, and future: MyHeritage’s integrated suite of products enable users to discover their family history and ethnic origins, find new relatives, and receive valuable insights to help manage choices regarding their health that may impact their future well-being.

“Our Health + Ancestry test is the next step in the evolution of MyHeritage. After 16 years of changing lives for the better through family history research and genetic genealogy, we are excited to expand our mission and try to improve and save lives as well. Our vision is to integrate our successful family history technologies with the new health product in innovative ways that bridge heritage and heredity to deliver deeper insights for our users,” said Gilad Japhet, founder and CEO of MyHeritage. “We are proud to be part of a movement to democratize healthcare globally and make genetic testing accessible to millions of people, and allow them to discover what makes them unique.”

The MyHeritage DNA Health + Ancestry test provides health reports that show users their risk of developing or carrying genetic conditions. Reports include conditions where specific genes contribute to the risk, such as hereditary breast cancer, late-onset Alzheimer’s disease, and late-onset Parkinson’s disease; conditions associated with multiple genes, such as heart disease, and type 2 diabetes; and carrier status reports on conditions that can be passed down from a couple to their children, such as Tay-Sachs disease and cystic fibrosis.

In total, MyHeritage’s Health + Ancestry test covers one of the most extensive ranges of conditions offered by an at-home DNA test: 11 Genetic Risk Reports, including a hereditary breast cancer (BRCA) report that tests 10 pathogenic variants; 3 Polygenic Risk Reports; and 15 Carrier Status Reports.

The World Health Organization identifies cardiovascular disease as the number one cause of death globally. This makes MyHeritage’s unique report for heart disease risk particularly beneficial. This report is based on a cutting-edge method called Polygenic Risk Score that examines hundreds, and in some cases thousands of variants across the entire genome.

In addition to heart disease, the Health + Ancestry product also includes a Polygenic Risk Score for type 2 diabetes, a condition that has significantly increased in prevalence in recent decades and now affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and 40% of Americans within their lifetime. MyHeritage is also unique in providing a third Polygenic Risk Score for breast cancer, which delivers a risk assessment for breast cancer when none of the BRCA variants that MyHeritage tests for are found. MyHeritage is currently the only major home DNA testing company to offer Polygenic Risk Reports for multiple conditions, and more Polygenic Risk Reports will be added shortly after the product’s initial release. The three initial Polygenic Risk Reports support only populations with European ancestry, but the company has begun conducting research to allow the polygenic reports to cover a broader spectrum of populations in the future.

The new product is based on robust scientific research conducted by the MyHeritage science team led by MyHeritage’s Chief Science Officer, Dr. Yaniv Erlich. It has been in development for two years and leverages the company’s growing expertise in genomics. MyHeritage’s prowess in the field of consumer genetics has led to the growth of its DNA database to 3 million people in under two and a half years. To balance the needs of genetic genealogy and health testing, MyHeritage has custom-designed a new DNA chip using Illumina’s Global Screening Array (GSA). The new chip provides MyHeritage with the flexibility to add reports for more conditions, without the need for users to retest their DNA. Several new health reports are already in the pipeline for release over the coming months following the company’s rigorous validation processes.

MyHeritage DNA Health + Ancestry is a Laboratory Developed Test, processed in a CLIA certified and CAP accredited DNA lab in Texas. The at-home DNA test is an easy and painless cheek swab, and does not require spitting as some other tests do, which makes it more suitable and convenient for all populations, including older people.

Health reports only determine users’ genetic risk for the supported conditions. However, all users are required to complete a personal and family health history questionnaire, to ensure that each user receives the reports appropriate for them. MyHeritage works with PWNHealth, an independent physician network and genetic counseling service, to provide end-to-end physician oversight of the MyHeritage DNA Health + Ancestry test for all U.S. customers, which includes genetic counseling, if appropriate. PWNHealth’s physician oversight and genetic counseling fee is included in the total price.

Privacy is strictly enforced. All health data is protected by state-of-the-art encryption. Health report data is secured using additional password protection and is so secure that even MyHeritage employees cannot access it. MyHeritage has never licensed or sold user data, and has committed to never do so without obtaining explicit user consent. MyHeritage is the only consumer DNA company that has pledged to never sell data to insurance companies. It also applies a strict policy to prohibit use of its DNA services by law enforcement agencies.

The MyHeritage DNA Health + Ancestry kit is available at the price of $199 + shipping. Users who have already purchased a MyHeritage DNA test for ethnicity and genealogy matching can upgrade to receive health reports for $120. To order, visit the MyHeritage DNA website. An annual Health subscription is available as an optional add-on to the new DNA kit, which grants users access to new health reports as they are released. As a special benefit for the launch, the Health subscription is currently offered for free for the first twelve months and users can cancel it anytime.

The new health product is not intended to independently diagnose, prevent, or treat any disease or condition or tell users anything about their current state of health in the absence of medical and clinical information. The product is also not intended for making medical decisions, including prescription or dosing of medications. Users may need to obtain further services from their physician, a genetic counselor, or other healthcare provider, in order to obtain diagnostic results regarding the conditions or diseases indicated within the MyHeritage DNA health reports. The health reports provide genetic risk information based on assessment of specific genetic variants but do not report on users’ entire genetic profile. The health reports do not detect all genetic variants related to a given disease, and the absence of a variant tested does not rule out the presence of other genetic variants that may be related to the disease. For most diseases, currently known genes are only responsible for a portion of the overall risk. Other factors such as environment and lifestyle may affect the risk of developing a given disease and, depending on the condition, may be more relevant predictors. If a user’s data indicate that the user is not at elevated genetic risk for a disease or condition, this should not be interpreted as meaning that the user is safe from developing the disease or condition. The opposite is also true; if a user’s data indicates that the user is at an elevated genetic risk for a disease or condition, it does not mean that the user will definitively develop the disease or condition. Any findings within the health reports should be confirmed and supplemented by additional medical and clinical testing as recommended by the user’s healthcare provider.

MyHeritage DNA Health + Ancestry is available globally except in a few countries that do not allow health-related consumer genetic testing. In the USA, it is available in all states except New York, New Jersey, and Rhode Island, where separate laboratory certifications are required and are currently being pursued. Altogether, MyHeritage DNA Health + Ancestry is now the genetic test for health available in the greatest number of languages and with the widest global reach.

Genealogy News Bytes – 2 July 2019


Some of the genealogy news items across my desktop the last four days include:

1)  News Articles:


*  
Family History Fanatics: “2019 Summer of DNA eConference” on 9 August 2019








*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar – Tuesday, 2 July, 7 p.m. PDT:  Remedies for Copy & Paste Genealogy, by Cyndi Ingle

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar – Wednesday, 3 July, 11 a.m. PDT:  Evaluating Shared DNA, by Paul Woodbury

4)  Genealogy Education – Podcasts:

*  Fisher’s Top Tips Podcast:  #84: Learning history


5)  Genealogy Videos (YouTube):

*  BYU Family History Library:  Timelines by Rayanne Melick
*  Genealogy TV:  Correlation of Evidence

6)  Genealogy Bargains:

*  Genealogy Bargains Tuesday, July 2,  2019


7)  DNA Success Stories:




8)  Did you miss the last Genealogy News Bytes – 28 June 2019?

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Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the “Comments” link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

When Your Family History Meets Technology

Throughout history, populations have been on the move. The Pilgrims moved to America to escape religious intolerance. And throughout time, humans have relocated to find refuge and/or opportunity. But did you know that those journeys can be reflected in your DNA? Ancestry scientists can now detect groups of people based on DNA connections (matches) that Read More

The post When Your Family History Meets Technology appeared first on Ancestry Blog.

Genealogy News Bytes – 26 April 2019


Some of the genealogy news items across my desktop the last three days include:

1)  News Articles:


*  
Ancestry’s IPO Talk Shows How Consumer DNA Testing Has Matured






2)  New or Updated Record Collections:

Friday Finds 26 April 2019


3)  Genealogy Education – Webinars:

 GeneaWebinars Calendar


*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar – Tuesday, 30 April 7 p.m. PDT:  English Parish Records: More than Hatch, Match and Dispatch, by Helen V. Smith

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar – Wednesday, 1 May 11 a.m. PDT:  How to Use Autosomal DNA to Resolve Historical Paternity Cases, by Ugo Perego

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:   Comparing the Genealogy Giants: Ancestry.com, FamilySearch, Findmypast and MyHeritage 2019 edition, by Sunny Morton

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  How I Built My Own Brick Wall,by Rebecca Whitford Koford


*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  Finding Your 17th Century Ancestors in England, by Paul Milner

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  England’s Quarter Sessions Records, by Paul Milner

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar: Making Sense of the English Census, by Paul Milner

4)  Genealogy Education – Podcasts:

*  Fisher’s Top Tips Podcast:  #65 – Marking Your Pictures

*  The Photo Detective Podcast:  Episode 38: The Last Muster Journey



5)  Genealogy Education – Video:

*  23andMe YouTube:  DNA Day Videos (many)

MyHeritage YouTube:  DNA Day Videos (many)


*  Boundless Genealogy YouTube:  Genealogy Brick Wall Bertha Case Study: Step 1

*  The BYU Family History Library Library YouTube:  The Knowles Collection- Todd Knowles


*  Family History Fanatics YouTube:  Family Activities to Involve Children in Family History






8)  Did you miss the last Genealogy News Bytes – 23 April 2019?

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Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the “Comments” link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Eurasian origin of mtDNA L3 and Y-chromosome DE

I’ve argued for a similar scenario for years, so it’s nice to see a preprint on the topic.

bioRxiv doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/233502

Carriers of mitochondrial DNA macrohaplogroup L3 basic lineages migrated back to Africa from Asia around 70,000 years ago.

Vicente M Cabrera et al.

Background: After three decades of mtDNA studies on human evolution the only incontrovertible main result is the African origin of all extant modern humans. In addition, a southern coastal route has been relentlessly imposed to explain the Eurasian colonization of these African pioneers. Based on the age of macrohaplogroup L3, from which all maternal Eurasian and the majority of African lineages originated, that out-of-Africa event has been dated around 60-70 kya. On the opposite side, we have proposed a northern route through Central Asia across the Levant for that expansion. Consistent with the fossil record, we have dated it around 125 kya. To help bridge differences between the molecular and fossil record ages, in this article we assess the possibility that mtDNA macrohaplogroup L3 matured in Eurasia and returned to Africa as basic L3 lineages around 70 kya. Results: The coalescence ages of all Eurasian (M,N) and African L3 lineages, both around 71 kya, are not significantly different. The oldest M and N Eurasian clades are found in southeastern Asia instead near of Africa as expected by the southern route hypothesis. The split of the Y-chromosome composite DE haplogroup is very similar to the age of mtDNA L3. A Eurasian origin and back migration to Africa has been proposed for the African Y-chromosome haplogroup E. Inside Africa, frequency distributions of maternal L3 and paternal E lineages are positively correlated. This correlation is not fully explained by geographic or ethnic affinities. It seems better to be the result of a joint and global replacement of the old autochthonous male and female African lineages by the new Eurasian incomers. Conclusions: These results are congruent with a model proposing an out-of-Africa of early anatomically modern humans around 125 kya. A return to Africa of Eurasian fully modern humans around 70 kya, and a second Eurasian global expansion by 60 kya. Climatic conditions and the presence of Neanderthals played key roles in these human movements.

Link

The Science Behind AncestryDNA — #NGS2017GEN

Chromosome inheritance diagram credit Ancestry.comJulie Granka, of AncestryDNA, spoke about “Understanding the Science Behind Your DNA Results” at the 2017 National Genealogical Society Conference last week. I’m hardly qualified to report about this session, but I’ll give it a try. Julie started by defining several terms, utilizing lots of diagrams. I was hoping to link to some pages on Ancestry.com that contain explanations as clear and simple as Julie’s. No luck. If I am going to provide links to basic information about DNA and genealogy, I will have to send you to someplace other than Ancestry. That is too bad. They should publish Julie’s presentation on their website.

Judy Russell, The Legal Genealogist, has provided a nice list of links to introductory information. See “DNA Basics for a Sound Foundation.”

Suffice it to say, there are basic building blocks of DNA that are represented by the letters A, C, G, and T. Our chromosomes are composed of long strings of these—3 billion, in fact. Almost all the letters are the same in every single person on the planet. Julie said that only about 10 million are different among different individuals and populations. A DNA test looks at about 700,000 of them. A location in the string of letters where the letters differ between individuals is called a SNP (pronounced “snip”). A group of inherited letters is called a haplotype.

Julie studies SNPs and haplotypes in the context of human populations. “Patterns of SNPs and haplotypes among human populations are driven by history,” she said. “As humans migrate, they bring their DNA with them.” She explained the founder effect: Not everyone in a population has the same SNPs and haplotypes. If a small number of people migrate somewhere, their most common SNPs and haplotypes are likely to be different than the parent population. They have founded a population with a different profile than the parent population. A related phenomena is isolation. If I understand correctly, newborns in an isolated population are statistically more likely to have the most common SNPs and haplotypes of their population. These effects make different populations look different genetically.

AncestryDNA uses the SNPs and haplotypes to determine three things. 

  • Tiny amounts of the haplotypes and SNPs associated with a population from the distant past (hundreds of thousands of years) survive in our DNA. AncestryDNA uses this information to provide your ethnicity estimates. To determine what SNPs and haplotypes are associated with distant populations, AncestryDNA uses reference panels. These are individuals whose haplotypes and SNPs are thought to be representative of the distant populations. AncestryDNA has 26 reference panels. Founder effect and isolation make ethnicity estimates easy. Migration makes ethnicity estimates difficult.
  • Large amounts of shared haplotypes between two persons indicate recent common ancestors. The more closely related, the more DNA is shared. AncestryDNA uses this information to provide your DNA matches. There are several challenges in determining DNA matches. Just sharing DNA doesn’t mean you are closely related. DNA you share for other reasons is called identical by state (IBS). DNA shared because of recent common ancestry is called identical by descent (IBD). AncestryDNA has to determine the difference. Another challenge arises from the way DNA is processed in the laboratory. For any given SNP, the data coming from the lab does not differentiate between the value contributed by your father and the value coming from your mother. AncestryDNA uses tools to estimate which came from which. She didn’t say this, but I would guess that if they ever get it wrong, you could be shown relatives who aren’t really your relatives.
  • In between the two extremes, AncestryDNA searches for groups of people who share large numbers of matches to others within a group. They use this information to provide your Genetic Communities.

It is possible to share no DNA at all with cousins. The closer the cousin, the higher the probability of shared DNA. Julie showed these numbers:

Cousin Probability of shared DNA
1st 100
2nd 100
3rd 98
4th 71
5th 32
6th 11
7th 3.2

She showed a chart that looked like the one below. I think it indicated the average amount of shared DNA between two close relatives. It went by so fast, I am not certain. However, Blaine T. Bettinger provides similar data, which I’ve charted below.

Blaine T. Bettinger, “The Shared CM Project – Version 2.0 (June 25, 2016),” PDF chart, _The Genetic Genealogist_ (http://www.thegeneticgenealogist.com : updated 31 July 2016).
Source: Blaine T. Bettinger, “The Shared CM Project – Version 2.0 (June 25, 2016),” The Genetic Genealogist (http://www.thegeneticgenealogist.com : updated 31 July 2016).

AncestryDNA uses these numbers to estimate your relationship to your DNA matches.

She covered more, but that’s about all I have time and space for here. I’m sorry that I’m not as clear as she was, but hopefully you learned something.

 

 

Chromosome inheritance diagram credit: Catherine A. Ball, et. al., “DNA Circles White Paper,” Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com/cs/dna-help/circles/whitepaper : updated 18 November 2014), figure 2.1.

Who Do You Think You Are? Recap: Matthew Morrison

In Who Do You Think You Are?, Matthew Morrison uncovered fascinating ancestors, each with their own tales of hardship and triumph. For some time, however, roadblocks stood in the way of discovering his ancestor’s stories. Only a tight combination of historical records and DNA could unlock the secrets in Matthew’s tree. The marriage of records Read More

The post Who Do You Think You Are? Recap: Matthew Morrison appeared first on Ancestry Blog.

After Malcom X, Facebook, DNA Databases, More: Friday Afternoon ResearchBuzz, February 22, 2019

NEW RESOURCES

CAIR: CAIR Research Director Launches ‘After Malcolm Digital Archive’ with George Mason University. “The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), the nation’s largest Muslim civil rights and advocacy organization, today announced that CAIR National Director of Research and Advocacy Dr. Abbas Barzegar has launched the ‘After Malcolm Digital Archive’ with George Mason University’s Ali Vural Ak Center for Global Islamic Studies.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

CNET: Mark Zuckerberg to meet with UK culture chief after ‘digital gangsters’ report. “Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is set to meet with UK Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright at the company’s California headquarters on Thursday afternoon. [Yesterday – TJC] The meeting comes just days after a British government report slammed Facebook and other companies for ‘considering themselves to be ahead of and beyond the law’ and accused Zuckerberg of ‘contempt’ for the UK. ”

AZCentral: Controversial DNA database bill scaled back to patient care professionals only. “A controversial bill that would have created a massive statewide database of DNA from a myriad of professionals, volunteers and even dead people has been scaled back. Sen. David Livingston, R-Peoria, the bill sponsor, has introduced an amendment to Senate Bill 1475 that would require DNA only from professionals who care for patients with intellectual disabilities in an intermediate care facility.”

USEFUL STUFF

Make Tech Easier: 5 Chrome Extensions to Speed Up Your Browsing. “Chrome is known as the fastest browser, but for some people even fastest isn’t enough. Moreover, Chrome is also a huge memory hog and may lead to a slower browsing experience on low-end devices. Thankfully, there are many Chrome extensions available that will speed things up for you exponentially.”

MakeUseOf: How to Find Videos on Facebook. “It isn’t always easy to find what you’re looking for on Facebook. Confusing menu items and poor search results hide some of the stuff worth looking at. Videos are one of the biggest victims. With that in mind, here’s how to find videos on Facebook.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

University of Michigan: Historical Letters In U-M Zoology Museum Archive Highlight Links Between Specimen Collection, Conservation . “Clark Schmutz spent more than 100 hours last semester reading and digitally scanning hundreds of letters in the correspondence files of the University of Michigan Museum of Zoology’s mammal collections, which date back to the 1800s. The scanning project is a multiyear effort to make the museum’s correspondence files available online. For Schmutz, who graduated in December with a double major in English and ecology, evolution and biodiversity, it was also an opportunity to search for intriguing stories that illustrate the links between museum collections and conservation.”

Independent (Ireland): Rodin statue outside Nando’s among first to feature in new database. “A statue of Eve by Auguste Rodin that sits outside a Nando’s restaurant in Harlow is one of the first to be included in a new database of publicly owned sculptures in the UK. Charitable organisation Art UK is working on what they say is the largest sculpture cataloguing project ever undertaken in the UK. They endeavour to have listed an estimated 150,000 pieces online by 2020.”

Mashable: Restoration YouTube will bring you deep into an internet rabbit hole. “The restoration community is a corner of YouTube boasting thousands of subscribers and millions of views. For the most part, it breaks down into four major subdivisions: shoes, swords and knives, small machinery, and toy restoration. Surprisingly, though, while all of these items are different, most of the content creators all had similar things to say.” The art restoration is pretty terrific too. Check out Baumgartner Restoration’s YouTube channel.

SECURITY & LEGAL

ZDNet: Adobe sends out second fix for critical Reader data leak vulnerability. “Adobe has released a second patch to resolve a critical zero-day vulnerability in Adobe Reader after its original fix failed. The vulnerability, CVE-2019-7089, was patched in Adobe’s February 12 patch release. Buried among 42 other critical bugs, the security flaw was described as a sensitive data leak problem which can lead to information disclosure when exploited.”

RESEARCH & OPINION

NewsCentral24x7: How a Script-Agnostic Media Can Empower The Illiterate. “In such an English-dominating virtual world, where technology, too, is largely developed and designed by native English-speaking persons, how do the oral or illiterate communities become a part? There is no denying that with the help of basic digital tools, people can be empowered to tell their own stories, beating long-set information exchange criterion of being able to read and write one or more script. By using the medium of spoken words and audio-visual story-telling, masses are better placed in the current information economy.” Good afternoon, Internet…

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