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Genealogy News Bytes – 22 March 2019


Some of the genealogy news items across my desktop the last four days include:

1)  News Articles:


 
Press Release: Bode Forensic Genealogy Service (FGS)



2)  New or Updated Record Collections:

*  Friday Finds 22 March 2019




*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar – Tuesday, 26 March, 11 a.m. PDT:  Following Your Family’s Immigration Trail on MyHeritage, by Mike Mansfield

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar – Wednesday, 27 March, 11 a.m. PDT:  No Purchase Necessary: Free Genealogy Tools for Your iPad/iPhone, by Devin Ashby

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  The Five-story Fall: Correlating Indirect and Direct Evidence to Extend the Pedigree, by Debra S. Mieszala


*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  Rescuing Orphaned Items: How to Save and Share Ebay, Etsy and Flea Market Finds, by Thomas MacEntee

4)  Genealogy Education – Podcasts:

*  Fisher’s Top Tips Podcast:  #55:  DNA Tests Results

*  Genealogy Guys Podcast:  #359
*  The Photo Detective Podcast:  Episode 33: Spring Cleaning Your Photos

5)  Genealogy Education – Video:


*  DearMYRTLE YouTube:  WACKY Wednesday – YOU are the client
*  The In-Depth Genealogist:  FYR and Relative Race Season 5 Ep2

*  BYU Family History Library YouTube:  Discovering the FamilySearch Family Tree App – James Tanner
*  Valerie and Myrt’s Excellent Genealogy Adventures YouTube:  WiFi in Europe
*  Valerie and Myrt’s Excellent Genealogy Adventures YouTube:  Secret Compartments & Other Travel TIps
*  American Ancestors YouTube:  Using and Evaluating Published Genealogies




8)  Did you miss the last Genealogy News Bytes – 18 March 2019?

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Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the “Comments” link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Seavers in the News — App Purcell Seaver Dies in 1961 in Gate City, Virginia

It’s time for another edition of “Seavers in the News” – a weekly feature from the historical newspapers about persons with the surname Seaver that are interesting, useful, mysterious, fun, macabre, or add information to my family tree database.

This week’s entry is from the Kingsport [Tenn.] Times-News newspaper dated 12 March 1961:

The transcription of the article is:


“App Purcell Seaver

“GATE CITY, Va. — App Purcell Seaver, 92, died at 1 p.m. Saturday at the home of a daughter, Mrs. Rhea Rose, after a lingering illness.

“He was operator of Seaver’s Harness Shop in Gate City before his retirement.  He was a member of the Gate City Methodist Church.  A son, Carter William Seaver, died in December, 1960.

“Survivors include two sons, Robert E. and Jamie L. Seaver, both of Gate City; five daughters, Mrs. Rhea Rose, Mrs. B.H. Quillen, Mrs. Grace Maness, Mrs. T.M. Elliott and Mrs. L.B. Ferbranche, all of Gate City;  20 grandchildren, 34 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild.

“The body will be removed to the home of Mrs. Rhea Rose at 10 a.m. Sunday from Scott County Funeral Home.”

The source citation for the article is:

“App Purcell Seaver” Kingsport [Tenn.] Times-News newspaper, obituary, Sunday, 12 March 1961, page 4, column 1, App Purcell Seaver obituary;   Newspapers.com   (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 21 March 2019).

No age, birth date or birth place was provided for App Purcell Seaver.  A death date of 11 March 1961 can be inferred from the obituary (Saturday, presumably the day before the obituary appeared in the newspaper).  The real prize here are the names of the eight children, but only two of the daughters has a first name listed (unless “Rhea” is a husband’s name!).

I had App Purcell Seaver (1869-1961) in my RootsMagic family tree.  He was the youngest child of Jeremiah Seaver (1805-1869) and Elvina Counts (1829-1900) of Hawkins County, Tennessee.  App married Lillie Hutchens (1873-????) in about 1892 in Tennessee.  My database showed 8 children born to this couple:

*  Ethel R. Seaver (1894-????)
*  Carrie Ella Seaver (1897-1994), married Belt H. Quillen.
*  Grace V. Seaver (1897-????) (married Maness)
*  Garnet J. Seaver (1899-????)
*  Robert Eldridge Seaver (1901-1969), married Elizabeth Amelia Herron (1905-1988) before 1923.
*  William Carter Seaver (1905-1960), married Ova Marie Roberts (1924-2012) before 1959.
*  Jamie L. Seaver (1909-1981)
*  Mildred Elizabeth Seaver (1912-2000), married Lawrence B. Ferbrache (1908-2003) in 1933.

I did not have spouse names for Ethel, Grace, Garnet, or Jamie.   On Find A Grave, I found most of these children buried in Holston View Cemetery in Weber City, Virginia.  Ethel R. is Ethel Rhea Seaver Rose, wife of Frank R. Rose; Grace’s husband is Richard S. Maness; Garnet’s spouse is Paris  M. Elliott. 

I am not related to this group of Seaver persons.  The earliest Seaver in this group is Casper Seaver (1720-1752) who was born in Germany.

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Disclosure:  I have a paid subscription to Newspapers.com and have used it extensively to find articles about my ancestral and one-name families.



Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the “Comments” link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook,  or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


Statistical Palaeoafricans

According to a new preprint by Durvasula and Sankararaman (D+S):

Using this method, we find that ~7.97±0.6% of the genetic ancestry from the West African Yoruba population traces its origin to an unidentified, archaic population

This ~8% matches well the ~9% of “West Africa A” in Yoruba of the model of Skoglund et al. Figure 3D. If “West Africa A” corresponds to the Archaic Ghost of D+S, then the Mende have the most of it at ~13%.

I have long maintained that the higher genetic diversity of extant Sub-Saharan Africans is the result of admixture between “Afrasians” (a population that spawned Eurasians and much of the ancestry of Sub-Saharans and which had “low” (Eurasian-level) of genetic diversity) and multiple layers of “Palaeoafricans”. It would seem that one such layer has now been discovered.

Where did the Afrasians live? Recent developments pushed back the presence of modern humans in both North Africa and the Middle East, making both regions highly competitive as the cradle of the Afrasians. The odds for Sub-Saharan Africa have greatly diminished also by the discovery of late non-sapiens H. naledi in South Africa (which was naively postulated as a cradle based on the presence there today of genetically diverse San Bushmen, but who are not descendants of even Late Pleistocene South Africans), as well as of the archaic component in the genomes of West Africans. These discoveries pile up on top of known archaic skulls of late provenance in both Central and West Africa.

Remember though, that the archaic admixture in West Africans is “less archaic” (more closely related to H. sapiens) than the Neandertal/Denisovan ancestry which contributed to extant Eurasians. All Africans (modern or archaic) are a branch within the phylogeny of Eurasians, with Australoids (and now apparently East Asians too) having the deepest known strain of human ancestry inherited from the elusive Denisovans.

“He would raise a thousand Men at his own expence”?

At last night’s presentation on the John and Abigail Adams and George Washington, I related an anecdote that circulated at the First Continental Congress. It raised a question, so I decided to take a closer look at the record.

On 31 Aug 1774, John Adams dined with South Carolina delegate Thomas Lynch, Sr. (1727-1776, shown here) and wrote this into his diary:

He told us that Coll. Washington made the most eloquent Speech at the Virginia Convention that ever was made. Says he, “I will raise 1000 Men, subsist them at my own Expence, and march my self at their Head for the Relief of Boston.”

Silas Deane of Connecticut heard the same story about George Washington, writing home to his wife in the middle of September:

It is said that in the house of Burgesses in Virginia, on hearing of the Boston Port Bill, he offered to raise and arm and lead one thousand men himself at his own expense, for the defence of the country, were there need of it. His fortune is said to be equal to such an undertaking.

Adams recalled his conversation with Lynch in the autobiography he wrote in the early 1800s:

Mr. Lynch a Delegate from South Carolina, who, in conversation on the Unhappy State of Boston and its inhabitants, after some Observations had been made on the Eloquence of Mr. Patrick Henry and Mr. Richard Henry Lee, which had been very loudly celebrated by the Virginians, said that the most eloquent Speech that had ever been made in Virginia or any where else, upon American Affairs had been made by Colonel Washington.

This was the first time I had ever heard the Name of Washington, as a Patriot in our present Controversy, I asked who is Colonel Washington and what was his Speech?

Colonel Washington he said was the officer who had been famous in the late french War and in the Battle in which [Gen. Edward] Braddock fell. His Speech was that if the Bostonians should be involved in Hostilities with the British Army he would march to their relief at the head of a Thousand Men at his own expence. This Sentence Mr. Lynch said, had more Oratory in it, in his Judgment, than all that he had ever heard or read.

And in an 11 Nov 1807 letter to Dr. Benjamin Rush, Adams included the story among the influential “anecdotes” that preceded Washington:

Mr Lynch of South Carolina told me before We met in Congress in 1774 that “Colonel Washington had made the most eloquentt speech that ever had been Spoken upon the Controversy with England, viz That if the English Should Attack the People of Boston, he would raise a thousand Men at his own expence and march at their head to New England to their Aid.”

It’s a pity that there’s no basis to Lynch’s story. Sources from Virginia, where people were after all most likely to have heard Washington speak, say nothing about it.

Lynch and Adams spoke at the end of August. The Virginia delegation to the Congress started to arrive on 3 September, with Washington coming the next day. Yet the story continued to spread among the New England delegates, as shown by Deane repeating it in the middle of September. Even decades later, when Adams repeated the story, he didn’t write about now knowing it was untrue.

Evidently people were so impressed by Washington’s reported promise to march a thousand men to Boston that no one actually asked him about it.

FamilySearch: A Global Experience at #NGS2017GEN

The Ancestry Insider is a member of the NGS 2017 conference social media press.The 2017 National Genealogical Society conference wrapped up last Saturday, and after a couple of articles, so will I. Diane Loosely of FamilySearch spoke at the FamilySearch luncheon. Her title was “FamilySearch: A Global Experience.” She described three definitions of global for which FamilySearch is global.

One definitions of global refers to world-wide global reach. Diane showed us a FamilySearch booklet, My Family: Stories that Bring Us Together. It is available in 66 languages. FamilySearch has 5,000 family history centers located in 33 countries. They offer support to patrons in 13 languages.

FamilySearch operates cameras in countries across the globe. They have 5.6 billion names published online from many countries. They publish an additional 2 million names a day.

Diane showed a video, “Preserving and Accessing the Records of the World,” documenting record destruction in the Philippines resulting from super-Typhoon Yolanda. One town’s records, indeed all the town offices, were completely destroyed. All that was left was the cement floor of the building. Because FamilySearch had photographed their records, FamilySearch was able to restore all the records to them.

Diane said that FamilySearch is gathering the genealogies of villages in Africa that, today, are preserved only by “Rememberers.” Aging village elders have memorized the genealogies of the village. Many are old and their knowledge is perishing with them. In the case of 95-year old Opanin Kwame Nketia, FamilySearch interviewed him and documented 12 generations and 1,000 people. A couple of days later when they returned to thank him, they discovered he had passed way.

Diane said that 50 years ago FamilySearch canvassed Mexico, filming their records. It is thought that today 15 to 20% of those records have perished.

Another sense of the word global is the idea of operating on a whole set of things. To find and search all of FamilySearch’s records, you have to know a few ways of accessing the records. Diane showed a Kentucky probate collection containing 12,000 names and nearly a million images. Obviously, FamilySearch had not completely indexed the collection. To access all the records, you have to be prepared to browse through the images like you would microfilm. She also pointed out that some records are accessed only through the catalog.

Another sense of the word global is embracing the whole of something. “We feel a responsibility to help everyone discover their family history,” she said. She shared the quote from the Emory university study stating that the more children know about their family’s history, the stronger their sense of control over their lives and the higher their self-esteem. FamilySearch recently remodeled the first floor of the Salt Lake Family History Library to appeal to a younger generation.

Diane shared the well-known quote of Alex Haley:

In all of us there is a hunger, marrow-deep, to know our heritage—to know who we are and where we have come from. Without this enriching knowledge, there is a hollow yearning. No matter what our attainments in life, there is still a vacuum, an emptiness, and the most disquieting loneliness.

She then challenged us to choose a person we would like to introduce to family history. Prepare beforehand. Then go and give them a meaningful experience with family history.

 

 

Note: I was interested in where one might find Alex Haley’s original quote, as very few people cite the source. Barbara Renick in her book Genealogy 101: How to Trace Your Family’s History and Heritage (Thomas Nelson Inc., 2003) is the only source I could find who cited a source: “What Roots Means to Me,” Reader’s Digest (May 1977), 73-74.

The slow death of Out of Africa

The significance of the discovery of modern humans in Arabia >85kya is that it provides a second spot (other than Israel) were modern humans existed outside Africa long before the alleged 60kya blitz out of the continent. We now have modern humans outside Africa in roughly two locations (Israel and Arabia), and three time slices (~175-85kya) in Misliya, Shkul/Qafzeh, and Al Wusta-1. It is no longer tenable to claim that these modern humans “died out” to make way for the alleged 60kya OoA event.

An important implication of pre-60kya Eurasians not dying out is that in all likelihood mtDNA haplogroup L3 and Y-chromosome haplogroup E originated in Eurasia, not Africa, and represent major Eurasian admixture into Africa.

Out of Africa theory is not dead (yet), but it resembles Rocky Balboa taking punch after punch round after round over the last 10 years or so. Will it make a cinematic last round comeback and prove itself, or will it be dealt a knockout punch in the near future? 

Nature Ecology and Evolution (2018) doi:10.1038/s41559-018-0518-2

Homo sapiens in Arabia by 85,000 years ago

Understanding the timing and character of the expansion of Homo sapiens out of Africa is critical for inferring the colonization and admixture processes that underpin global population history. It has been argued that dispersal out of Africa had an early phase, particularly ~130–90 thousand years ago (ka), that reached only the East Mediterranean Levant, and a later phase, ~60–50 ka, that extended across the diverse environments of Eurasia to Sahul. However, recent findings from East Asia and Sahul challenge this model. Here we show that H. sapiens was in the Arabian Peninsula before 85 ka. We describe the Al Wusta-1 (AW-1) intermediate phalanx from the site of Al Wusta in the Nefud desert, Saudi Arabia. AW-1 is the oldest directly dated fossil of our species outside Africa and the Levant. The palaeoenvironmental context of Al Wusta demonstrates that H. sapiens using Middle Palaeolithic stone tools dispersed into Arabia during a phase of increased precipitation driven by orbital forcing, in association with a primarily African fauna. A Bayesian model incorporating independent chronometric age estimates indicates a chronology for Al Wusta of ~95–86 ka, which we correlate with a humid episode in the later part of Marine Isotope Stage 5 known from various regional records. Al Wusta shows that early dispersals were more spatially and temporally extensive than previously thought. Early H. sapiens dispersals out of Africa were not limited to winter rainfall-fed Levantine Mediterranean woodlands immediately adjacent to Africa, but extended deep into the semi-arid grasslands of Arabia, facilitated by periods of enhanced monsoonal rainfall.

Link

Who Do You Think You Are? Recap: Regina King

When Regina King started down the path to discover her ancestors, she knew their history may include some hardships. She was ready to face those hardships, because she believes “uncomfortable conversations are where solutions live.” During Regina’s journey to learn about her 2x great-grandfather, Moses Crosby, she learned first-hand about facing difficult facts about the Read More

The post Who Do You Think You Are? Recap: Regina King appeared first on Ancestry Blog.

New EdgeStar

Edgestar

The following review is addressed to wine savvies who acknowledge the importance of temperature in wine storage and serving and are searching for a cooler with an extensive capacity. The good news is that the New EdgeStar Cooler is among the units that can easily comply with these demands, due to its 46 bottles capacity, the storing section with individually set temperatures and the brilliantly efficient and sturdy construction. To put it simply this model takes into account all the factors that make for an excellent wine storage solution and innovatively incorporates them. Let’s find out the reasons why the New EdgeStar unit has been so acclaimed by private and commercial customers.

Features

  • It includes two cooling sections, for storing wine varieties with distinctive requirements 
  • Upper section temperature range is between 41 and 51 degrees Fahrenheit ( for white wine)
  • Lower section temperature range is between 54 and 64 degrees Fahrenheit (for red wine)
  • Upper section can accommodate 14 normal size bottles; lower section has a 32 bottle capacity
  • The dual paned doors can be locked and account for an excellent insulation
  • It includes an auto-defrosting feature
  • The interior is light by powerful blue-colored LEDs
  • Rubber has been used to mitigate the noise caused by the compressor and the vibrations
  • Measures 23.5×33.25×22.75 inches, weighs approximately 80 pounds, 46 standard size bottle capacity
  • Low power consumption, 115 V, 300 W, 60 Hz, 2.5 A
  • Upper section equipped with between 1 and eight shelves, lower section includes 1 to 6 shelves (wood)
  • Each shelf includes aluminium capping for better adherence
  • Casing constructed of stainless steel and plastic
  • The New EdgeStar best wine coolers unit has been approved by the ETL

Reputation

Overall, any individual with an extensive collection of wine can benefit from the New EdgeStar significantly. Although mostly designed to work with wine bottles of typical size, removing some shelves can accommodate larger ones as well. It is necessary to point out that this model is among the preferred ones for commercial purposes, due to the high capacity, low noise level and energy efficiency. While it still works on the compression cooling method, the motor has been enhanced significantly, and you will not be able to tell the difference between it and a thermoelectric one.

A further reason to acquire this model is the versatility provided by the two storing sections with proper temperatures. Since white wine and red wine have unique requirements, the only way to store them properly would have been to purchase two different coolers. However, the New EdgeStar cooler has solved the problem brilliantly. The construction of the casing and the shelves, though targeting the functionality aspects, looks excellent and is enhanced by the interior LED light. The singular quarrel with this cooler would be that a few adjustments could have allowed it to accommodate larger bottles, but it is perceived as a minor setback.

Conclusion

To put it simply, the New EdgeStar wine cooler can accommodate an approximate number of 46 wine bottles in excellent conditions, regardless of the assortment. It is compact, well designed, sturdy and versatile, which makes it an excellent purchase. Moreover, it can be used as a countertop, under top or freestanding and takes up quite a small amount of space, if you were to consider its capacity. Overall, the New EdgeStar employs innovative principles to provide the highest amount of storage space, reduce the energy consumption, maintain the preset temperatures constant and give your collection an impressive look.

 

The Science Behind AncestryDNA — #NGS2017GEN

Chromosome inheritance diagram credit Ancestry.comJulie Granka, of AncestryDNA, spoke about “Understanding the Science Behind Your DNA Results” at the 2017 National Genealogical Society Conference last week. I’m hardly qualified to report about this session, but I’ll give it a try. Julie started by defining several terms, utilizing lots of diagrams. I was hoping to link to some pages on Ancestry.com that contain explanations as clear and simple as Julie’s. No luck. If I am going to provide links to basic information about DNA and genealogy, I will have to send you to someplace other than Ancestry. That is too bad. They should publish Julie’s presentation on their website.

Judy Russell, The Legal Genealogist, has provided a nice list of links to introductory information. See “DNA Basics for a Sound Foundation.”

Suffice it to say, there are basic building blocks of DNA that are represented by the letters A, C, G, and T. Our chromosomes are composed of long strings of these—3 billion, in fact. Almost all the letters are the same in every single person on the planet. Julie said that only about 10 million are different among different individuals and populations. A DNA test looks at about 700,000 of them. A location in the string of letters where the letters differ between individuals is called a SNP (pronounced “snip”). A group of inherited letters is called a haplotype.

Julie studies SNPs and haplotypes in the context of human populations. “Patterns of SNPs and haplotypes among human populations are driven by history,” she said. “As humans migrate, they bring their DNA with them.” She explained the founder effect: Not everyone in a population has the same SNPs and haplotypes. If a small number of people migrate somewhere, their most common SNPs and haplotypes are likely to be different than the parent population. They have founded a population with a different profile than the parent population. A related phenomena is isolation. If I understand correctly, newborns in an isolated population are statistically more likely to have the most common SNPs and haplotypes of their population. These effects make different populations look different genetically.

AncestryDNA uses the SNPs and haplotypes to determine three things. 

  • Tiny amounts of the haplotypes and SNPs associated with a population from the distant past (hundreds of thousands of years) survive in our DNA. AncestryDNA uses this information to provide your ethnicity estimates. To determine what SNPs and haplotypes are associated with distant populations, AncestryDNA uses reference panels. These are individuals whose haplotypes and SNPs are thought to be representative of the distant populations. AncestryDNA has 26 reference panels. Founder effect and isolation make ethnicity estimates easy. Migration makes ethnicity estimates difficult.
  • Large amounts of shared haplotypes between two persons indicate recent common ancestors. The more closely related, the more DNA is shared. AncestryDNA uses this information to provide your DNA matches. There are several challenges in determining DNA matches. Just sharing DNA doesn’t mean you are closely related. DNA you share for other reasons is called identical by state (IBS). DNA shared because of recent common ancestry is called identical by descent (IBD). AncestryDNA has to determine the difference. Another challenge arises from the way DNA is processed in the laboratory. For any given SNP, the data coming from the lab does not differentiate between the value contributed by your father and the value coming from your mother. AncestryDNA uses tools to estimate which came from which. She didn’t say this, but I would guess that if they ever get it wrong, you could be shown relatives who aren’t really your relatives.
  • In between the two extremes, AncestryDNA searches for groups of people who share large numbers of matches to others within a group. They use this information to provide your Genetic Communities.

It is possible to share no DNA at all with cousins. The closer the cousin, the higher the probability of shared DNA. Julie showed these numbers:

Cousin Probability of shared DNA
1st 100
2nd 100
3rd 98
4th 71
5th 32
6th 11
7th 3.2

She showed a chart that looked like the one below. I think it indicated the average amount of shared DNA between two close relatives. It went by so fast, I am not certain. However, Blaine T. Bettinger provides similar data, which I’ve charted below.

Blaine T. Bettinger, “The Shared CM Project – Version 2.0 (June 25, 2016),” PDF chart, _The Genetic Genealogist_ (http://www.thegeneticgenealogist.com : updated 31 July 2016).
Source: Blaine T. Bettinger, “The Shared CM Project – Version 2.0 (June 25, 2016),” The Genetic Genealogist (http://www.thegeneticgenealogist.com : updated 31 July 2016).

AncestryDNA uses these numbers to estimate your relationship to your DNA matches.

She covered more, but that’s about all I have time and space for here. I’m sorry that I’m not as clear as she was, but hopefully you learned something.

 

 

Chromosome inheritance diagram credit: Catherine A. Ball, et. al., “DNA Circles White Paper,” Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com/cs/dna-help/circles/whitepaper : updated 18 November 2014), figure 2.1.

Who Do You Think You Are? Recap: Matthew Morrison

In Who Do You Think You Are?, Matthew Morrison uncovered fascinating ancestors, each with their own tales of hardship and triumph. For some time, however, roadblocks stood in the way of discovering his ancestor’s stories. Only a tight combination of historical records and DNA could unlock the secrets in Matthew’s tree. The marriage of records Read More

The post Who Do You Think You Are? Recap: Matthew Morrison appeared first on Ancestry Blog.