My Kindle Books

  • www.amazon.com
  • www.amazon.com
  • www.amazon.com
  • www.amazon.com
  • www.amazon.com

Monthly Archives:

Genealogy News Bytes — Tuesday, 28 April 2020

Welcome to Genealogy News Bytes, posted on Tuesday afternoon and Friday afternoon, where we try to highlight the most important genealogy and family history news and education items that came across our desktop over the past four days.





2)  New or Updated Record Collections:




3)  Genealogy Education – Webinars (times are US Pacific):

 GeneaWebinars Calendar

*  View RootsTech 2020 Videos for FREE! 


*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar – Wednesday, 29 April, 11 a.m.:  Road Crews and Jury Selection: How To Find Where Our Ancestor Lived and Their Neighbors, by J. Mark Lowe

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar – Friday, 1 May, 11 a.m.:  The Future is Still in the Past: An Introduction to Online Parish Clerks in the United Kingdom, by Wayne Shepheard
*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  Working with DNA segments on MyHeritage, by Ran Snir

4)  Genealogy Education – Podcasts:

*  Fisher’s Top Tips: #175r – Sorting Them Out


*  The Genealogy Guys:  Podcast #377



5)  Genealogy Videos (YouTube):



*  Family History Fanatics:  DNA Q&A: Your Questions Answered


==============================================


Copyright (c) 2020, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the “Comments” link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Detailed Version: Registration for DearMYRTLE’s 2020 Webinars and Meetings

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: This is the “Detailed” version about how to register for our new 2020 Zoom Webinars and Meetings. If you’d like to skip to the “Quick and Dirty” registration info, you’ll find it here:  https://blog.dearmyrtle.com/2020/04/quick-and-dirty-registration-for.html


DearREADERS,
Cousin Russ and I are happy to present a spiffy new set of DearMYRTLE Webinars and DearMYRTLE Meetings for 2020. This post includes detailed instructions.

  • Best practices when attending any online event.
  • Links to helpful Zoom and DearMYRTLE recordings
  • Registration links for DearMYRTLE’s 2020 Webinars and Meetings.

During the past few years, we’ve relied on recurring virtual events, but wish to update these with the latest Zoom enhancements. As with any computer software and operating system, it is advisable to use the most recently reliable version. Upgrades provide new bug fixes, the latest security measures and new features.

BEST PRACTICES

  1. Sign up for a free Zoom Account and download the app for your device  here.
    https://zoom.us/pricing
  2. Under Settings, add your profile picture. See How to use Zoom’s Desktop App.
  3. When you register for a webinar or meeting, add it to your calendar.
  4. Be sure your  headset/mic are plugged in, then reboot your computer 15 minutes before attending any online event.
  5. Turn off memory-resident programs like Dropbox, MS Outlook, and Backblaze as these take up extra bandwidth.
  6. Ask other members of the household to refrain from accessing the internet. Turn off smart TVs, and other unused devices that may compromise bandwidth. This includes online games, streaming video and music.
  7. Keep your operating system, web browser and Zoom app up-to-date.

For more information see: 

NEW! 2020 REGISTRATION LINKS

MONDAYS WITH MYRT where we meet in webinar format for 90 minutes most Mondays throughout the year, providing practical, down-to-earth advice for family historians. We talk about anything and everything that’s come across our genea-desks in the past week. Powerful breakthroughs happen during our interactive live webinars.

How
We have a dedicated set of panelists, and you will appear without a webcam or mic as an attendee and can participate in the typed chat. Cousin Russ brings your comments to the panelists’ attention and may elect to turn on your mic if needed.


NEW! 2020 Mondays with Myrt Registration linkhttps://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_-XHFjdHrTwGW4aejM7pCww

When
Most Mondays each month.
Noon Eastern US (New York)
11am Central US (Chicago)
10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City)
9am Pacific US (Los Angeles)

If you need a time zone converter, this is the one DearMYRTLE recommends: https://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html

Reminder Emails
Currently Zoom Webinar technology provides registrants one confirmation email and 3 reminder emails. Reminders arrive 1 week, 1 day and 1 hour prior to a scheduled webinar. These will include your personal link and the password to enter the webinar.

Fee
This DearMYRTLE Webinar is presented at no cost. If you find the information useful, consider the Pay What You Want business model Ol’ Myrt employs. We use the donated funds to pay for our Zoom webinar membership. https://paypal.me/DearMYRTLE

Recorded Webinars
Archived webinars will show up on DearMYRTLE’s YouTube Channel. Most links we mention will appear in the description box under the video. See the list of videos with the most recent on top as well categorized in “playlists” of videos in categories. https://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE/

WACKY Wednesday where we take one topic from Mondays with Myrt and explore it in detail during this 60-minute Zoom webinar, usually hosted by one of DearMYRTLE’s *very distant* cousins.

How

We have a dedicated set of panelists, and you will appear as an attendee without a webcam or mic and can participate in the typed chat. Cousin Russ brings your comments to the panelists’ attention and may elect to turn on your mic if needed.

NEW! 2020 WACKY Wednesday Registration Linkhttps://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_c1I5_Qc6QMSFV1axgWcSyw WhenMost Wednesdays each month. 9pm Eastern US (New York) 8pm Central US (Chicago) 7pm Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City) 6pm Pacific US (Los Angeles) If you need a time zone converter, this is the one DearMYRTLE recommends: https://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html

Reminder Emails
Currently Zoom Webinar technology provides registrants one confirmation email and 3 reminder emails. Reminders arrive 1 week, 1 day and 1 hour prior to a scheduled webinar. These will include your personal link and the password to enter the webinar.

Fee
This DearMYRTLE Webinar is presented at no cost. If you find the information useful, consider the Pay What You Want business model Ol’ Myrt employs. We use the donated funds to pay for our Zoom webinar membership. https://paypal.me/DearMYRTLE

Recorded Webinars

Archived webinars will show up on DearMYRTLE’s YouTube Channel. Most links we mention will appear in the description box under the video. See the list of videos with the most recent on top as well categorized in “playlists” of videos in categories. https://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE/

MINI-MYRT MEETINGS are held for a quick 20 minutes most Tuesdays through Saturdays using Zoom Meeting (less formal, more conversation). YAY! Our goals?
  • PROVIDE an upbeat diversion during the pandemic isolation period.
  • DEMONSTRATE how easy it is to use Zoom Meetings.
  • ENCOURAGE others to use free Zoom technology to keep in contact with their FAN club.
HOW
The host and co-host arrive first, while attendees remain in the waiting room. This is a perfect time to test your headset/mic and webcam. It is not necessary to have a webcam to participate, but it is a lot more fun. The host will admit you to the Zoom Meeting, and both your mic and webcam will be automatically turned off. Look to the lower left side of the Zoom control bar to turn on your mic and/or webcam. Courtesy dictates the dress code is business casual and you should ensure there will be no unnecessary noise or unwanted visitors in the background. Otherwise you will be removed from the meeting. Come join the fun!


NEW! 2020 Mini-Myrt  Meeting Registration
https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYrcu-tqTwpG9Z8dYf49XNhRWo7CHapxkzl

When

Noon Eastern US (New York)
11am Central US (Chicago)
10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City)
9am Pacific US (Los Angeles)

Reminder Emails
Currently Zoom Meeting technology does *not* provide reminder emails. You must therefore *save* your confirmation email with your personal URL and password for admittance to Mini-Myrt.


Fee
This Mini-Myrt Meeting is presented at no cost.

Recording
We do not plan to record these Mini-Myrt Meetings.



THE ARCHIVE LADY 
Melissa LeMaster Barker, a Certified Archives Manager in Houston County, Tennessee, guides us through what to expect with visiting an archive as well as how to preserve the original documents and family heirlooms we father in our research.

How

We have a dedicated set of panelists, and you will appear as an attendee without a webcam or mic and can participate in the typed chat. Cousin Russ brings your comments to the panelists’ attention and may elect to turn on your mic if needed.


NEW! 2020 The Archive Lady Registration Link
https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_QYGmJREkQ1-zLHqokL9Lzw

When
4th Wednesday most months
9pm Eastern US (New York)
8pm Central US (Chicago)
7pm Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City)
6pm Pacific US (Los Angeles)

If you need a time zone converter, this is the one DearMYRTLE recommends: https://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html

Reminder Emails
Currently Zoom Webinar technology provides confirmation and 3 reminder emails to registrants. Reminders arrive 1 week, 1 day and 1 hour prior to a scheduled webinar.

Fee
This DearMYRTLE Webinar is presented at no cost. If you find the information useful, consider the Pay What You Want business model Ol’ Myrt. We use the donated funds to pay for our Zoom webinar membership. https://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE/

Recording
Archived webinars will show up on DearMYRTLE’s YouTube Channel. Most links we mention will appear in the description box under the video. See the list of videos most recent on top as well as the “playlists” of videos in categories.

https://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE/


If you value the interactive genealogy education provided in DearMYRTLE Webinars and Meetings, please consider donating. THANK-YOU in advance. https://paypal.me/DearMYRTLE

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     🙂
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE

Second Life: Clarise Beaumont

http://www.facebook.com/groups/DearMYRTLE
https://www.facebook.com/groups/organizedgenealogist

Our Path Forward

By Margo Georgiadis, president & chief executive officer For more than three decades, Ancestry has helped millions of people learn more about themselves by connecting them to their past so they can gain meaningful insights to impact their future. Our relentless focus on serving our customers has enabled us to sustain innovation and market leadership Read More

The post Our Path Forward appeared first on Ancestry Blog.

Genealogy News Bytes — Friday, 24 April 2020

Welcome to Genealogy News Bytes, posted on Tuesday afternoon and Friday afternoon, where we try to highlight the most important genealogy and family history news and education items that came across our desktop over the past three days.






2)  New or Updated Record Collections:



3)  Genealogy Education – Webinars (times are US Pacific):

 GeneaWebinars Calendar

*  View RootsTech 2020 Videos for FREE!




*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar – Tuesday, 28 April, 11 a.m.:  Working with DNA segments on MyHeritage, by Ran Snir

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar – Wednesday, 29 April, 11 a.m.:  Road Crews and Jury Selection: How To Find Where Our Ancestor Lived and Their Neighbors, by J. Mark Lowe

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar: Maryland State Archives Decoded, by Rebecca Koford

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  Introduction to Vivid-Pix RESTORE, by Rick Voight

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  Tech Zone: 3 Ways to Use Gmail Smarter, by Marian Pierre-Louis

4)  Genealogy Education – Podcasts:

*  Fisher’s Top Tips:  #174r – A Better Way

*  The Photo Detective:  Episode 81: The Genealogy Show in England

5)  Genealogy Videos (YouTube):

*  American Ancestors: How to Handle Old Books
*  BYU Family History Library:  Basic Paper Document Preservation with James Tanner


*  Family History Ron:  Family History Ron Q&A 9 Apr 2020
*  Family History Ron:  Family History Ron Q&A 23 Apr 2020
* Genetic Genealogy Ireland:  The Tree of Mankind from FTDNA (Mike Sager)



==============================================


Copyright (c) 2020, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the “Comments” link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Seavers in the News — George C. Seaver Dies in Johnson City, Tennessee in 1925

It’s time for another edition of “Seavers in the News” – a weekly feature from the historical newspapers about persons with the surname Seaver that are interesting, useful, mysterious, fun, macabre, or add information to my family tree database.

This week’s entry is from The Knoxville (Tenn.] Journal newspaper dated 26 August 1925:

The transcription of the article is:

“George C. Seaver
“JOHNSON CITY, Tenn., Aug. 25. — (Spl.) — Funeral services for George C. Seaver, 77 years old, who died Saturday evening at his home here, were held yesterday afternoon at 4 o’clock from the family residence, conducted by Dr. M.P. Carico, of the Munsey Memorial church, followed by interment in Oak Hill cemetery.  Mr. Seaver was a pioneer merchant of Johnson City, engaging in the hardware business as a member of the firm Seaver & Summers.  He was associated with the Summers Hardware company at the time of his death.  He is survived by the following children, all of whom were present at the funeral services:  Mrs. Charles Brown, Will Seaver, Mrs. W.C. Phlegar and Guy O. Seaver.”

The source citation is:

“George C. Seaver,” The Knoxville [Tenn.] Journal newspaper, death notice, Wednesday, 26 August, 1925, page 2, column 3, George C. Seaver obituaryNewspapers.com   (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 23 April 2020).

The only information of genealogical value in this obituary is George’s death date and place, his children’s current names, and his occupation.  There is nothing about his birth, spouse or marriage.

I had this family in my Seaver family tree database.  George Curry Seaver was born 2 August 1847 in Hawkins County, Tennessee, the son of Jeremiah and Nancy (Thurman) Seaver.  He married (1) Harriet Ruth “Hattie” Ballard (1848-1876) on 10 September 1871 in Washington County, Tennessee.  They had two children:

*  William Elbert Seaver (1874-1933).
*  Hattie May Seaver (1876-1900).

George Curry Seaver married (2) Mary Ruth “Mollie” Reeve (1855-1927) in about 1887 in Tennessee.  They had three children:
*  Georgia Reeve Seaver (1888-1933), married 1913 to Woodie Calvin Phelgar (1883-1947).
*  Guy Orlando Seaver (1890-1978, married 1920 to Ruth Lyle McCorkle (1898-1985).
*  Grace Rebecca Seaver (1893-???), who may have married Charles Brown.
I am not related to this Seaver line, since they descend from Henry and Elizabeth (–?–) Seaver who came from Germany and settled in Virginia before 1770.   

There are over 9,000 Seaver “stories” in my family tree – this was one of them.   Life happens, accidentally and intentionally, and  some persons experience hardship, overcome it,  and live long lives.  I am glad that I can honor George C. Seaver today.  

You never know when a descendant will find this blog post and learn something about their ancestors.

                                  =============================================


Disclosure:  I have a complimentary subscription to Newspapers.com and have used it extensively to find articles about my ancestral and one-name families.



Copyright (c) 2020, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the “Comments” link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook,  or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


“Jury went out after noon and did not agree all night”

On 20 Apr 1770, Benjamin Lynde, acting chief justice of the Massachusetts Superior Court, wrote in his diary:

Fair. Richardson and Wilmot’s tryal, begun morn. and Jury went out after noon and did not agree all night.

As recounted yesterday, Lynde indeed presided over the trial of former Customs employees Ebenezer Richardson and George Wilmot for murder.

The jury actually started deliberating about 11:00 P.M. Per the rules of the time, they were shut into a room of the courthouse and not given any food or drink or allowed to sleep. That was to encourage them to reach a verdict. (And of course it saved the government money.)

Those jurors had been drawn from Suffolk County outside of Boston, on the assumption that Bostonians might be biased. We have their names, and I wish I knew which towns they came from in order to nail down their identifications. I’m going to assume they’re the most prominent men of those names from Suffolk County outside Boston since a man had to be at a certain economic level to be on the jury list. (And because it’s easier to search where the light is best.)

The foreman was Jonathan Deming. A man of that name lived in the part of Needham that eventually became Wellesley. He was born in Boston in 1723, possibly son of a sea captain from Wethersfield, Connecticut, who later retired to the country. From his twenties Deming filled various town offices in Needham. In November 1768, Boston ministers published his intention to marry Elizabeth Clark, but that doesn’t appear to have worked out since in November of 1770 Deming went to Charlestown and married Esther Edes. He was in his late forties, but she was sixteen years younger, and they had three children over the next few years. Jonathan died in 1791 and Esther in 1792.

Apparently Deming and all the other jurors quickly agreed that Wilmot was innocent of the charge of murder. Most also agreed that Richardson was guilty. There were two holdouts from a quick unanimous verdict, Deming later testified:

Mr. Lothrop was satisfied as to Fact, but not Law. Mr. Clap not so fully satisfied as to Law.

Thomas Lothrop was from Hingham, the portion that became Cohasset in 1770. He had been born in 1738. After his father died and his mother remarried, he went to live with a rich uncle who left him an estate. Lothrop served in the French and Indian War, becoming a lieutenant, and in town government his neighbors chose him to be clerk, moderator, selectman, and eventually representative to the Massachusetts General Court. He married Ruth Nichols in 1760; they moved into a big house “near the cold spring” and raised twelve children.

Notably, as Massachusetts’s conflict with Britain heated up, Lothrop was active on Cohasset’s committee of correspondence and committee of inspection. He was also a militia officer, rising to lieutenant colonel in the 2nd Suffolk regiment during the war. Lothrop lived until 1813.

Seth Clap was born in Dedham in 1722, two years before part of that old town broke off to become Walpole, where he lived the rest of his life. Clap married Mary Bullard in 1745 and they had ten children before she died. In February 1769 Clap married Elizabeth Weatherbee, and they got right to having more children, the first arriving in November. Ultimately they had six. Clap served Walpole in various ways: as a schoolteacher as a young man, as a town clerk in his fifties, and in 1758 by “making a place in the meeting-house to secure the town stock of ammunition.” He died in 1788.

There’s no sign that Lothrop or Clap supported the royal government in 1770. In other words, their reluctance to convict Ebenezer Richardson wasn’t due to their politics. They were sincerely concerned about whether he should be convicted of murder for shooting at a crowd attacking his house. Lothrop later said, “I did not fall in so soon as some, for I thought the time might be as well spent in Argument.” Clap agreed, “At first going out I was not so clear as afterwards.”

In the wee hours of 21 April, 250 years ago today, Deming and the rest of the jury worked at winning over those two men. Clap apparently noted that under British common law a man was not guilty of murder if he killed someone breaking into his house. But that was only at night, other jurors replied. Richardson had shot young Christopher Seider “in the Day,” and that won Clap over. Deming assured him that “the Court knew the Law.”

What finally moved Lothrop was his fellow jurors’ belief that “if the verdict was not agreeable to Law the Court would not receive it.” The judges had already made clear they believed Richardson did not commit murder. Thus, a man could vote to convict him of a capital crime and not feel that he was necessarily sending the man to his death.

After dawn, the twelve jurors finally agreed on a verdict. About half an hour later Deming announced their decision in the courtroom. Wilmot was free to go, but everyone really cared about the other defendant. As Judge Lynde wrote in his diary:

Fair; Jury agreed abo. 9; Richardson guilty.

Judge Peter Oliver later wrote of the Whig crowd: “the Courtroom resounded with Expressions of Pleasure; ’till, even one of the Faction, who had some of the Feelings of Humanity not quite erased, cried out, ‘for Shame, for Shame Gentlemen!’—This hushed the clamorous Joy.”

The judges then adjourned court until 29 May, when one of the first orders of business would be sentencing Ebenezer Richardson.

Converting My Personal Library to Digital

NOTE: This is an update to an article I published several years ago. I have changed hardware since then and have updated my procedures significantly. This updated article reflects those changes.

I keep my computers and genealogy material in a small room in our house. I am sure the folks who built the house intended this room to be a child’s bedroom, but there are no children in the house, so I have converted it into something I call “our office.” I bet many people reading this article have done the same with a spare room in their homes.

bookscanningI have several computers and a 32-inch wide monitor in this room, a high-speed fiber optic Internet connection, a wi-fi mesh router, two printers (inkjet and laser), two scanners, several external hard drives used for making backups, oversized hi-fi speakers connected to the computers, and various other pieces of computer hardware. Luckily, these are all rather small, and advancing technology results in smaller and smaller devices appearing every year as I replace older devices.  The newer devices are almost always smaller than the old ones. However, I have a huge space problem: books and magazines. They don’t seem to be getting any smaller. My older books still take up as much room today as they did years ago.

“My office” has two bookcases that are each six feet tall and four feet wide, along with two smaller bookcases and a four-drawer filing cabinet. Pam and I share this “office,” so we have two desks, each laden with computers and printers. We squeeze a lot into a ten-foot-by-twelve-foot room.

I don’t want to count how many books I have purchased over the years, but I am sure it must be several hundred volumes. I don’t want to even think about the bottom-line price. I only have space in my four bookcases to store a tiny fraction of them; the rest are stored in boxes in the basement. Out-of-sight books are books that I rarely use. “Out of sight, out of mind.” I probably wasted my money by purchasing all those books as I rarely use most of them. I may have looked at them once, but I rarely go back to them again and again.

While four bookcases sounds like a lot of storage space, I filled them all years ago with books, magazines, software boxes, and stacks of CD-ROM disks. I don’t have room for any new purchases unless I first remove some of the items I already have and move them to boxes in the basement. Nowadays, I have more books and magazines in the basement than I do in the office.

My newly-purchased books and all the genealogy magazines I receive used to end up being stacked on the floor, on my desk, and in most any other nook or cranny I can find. The place was out of control, and I realized that I needed to find a solution. “I used to have a desk, and I am certain that it is still here… someplace. I think I saw it last year.”

SONY DSC

In the past few years, I have learned a few lessons. Since there is no space left for storage, I now prefer to obtain all new magazines in electronic format. Not only are they easier to store, but they are also easier to search.

I might want to look something up in the future. Of course, my computer can find words inside electronic files much faster than my fingers and eyeballs can find anything in the printed pages of hundreds of magazines. Many times I have said to myself, “I read an article about that a few years ago. Now, where was that article?” A search on a hard drive will find the information within seconds, but a manual search of books stored in boxes in the basement is rarely successful. Depending on the file format used, I can often find specific words or phrases inside a few thousand files within seconds. Try doing that with printed books!

However, those magazines are the smaller problem. My biggest problem is books, hundreds of them. I cannot afford to go back and repurchase all of the books again in electronic format. What should I do?

I mulled that question over for quite a while before I realized that there were only two possible solutions:

1. Get a larger house

or

2. Digitize the existing books and all future acquisitions, then get rid of the printed material

I cannot afford the first solution, so I went with the only option left: digitize the existing books and all future acquisitions. The decision became easier when I purchased a high-speed sheet feed scanner.

I am now in the slow and tedious process of cutting apart every book and magazine that I own and scanning every one of them. I am performing this task on a “time available” basis. I try to scan 50 or more pages a day, but I must admit that I haven’t been able to do that every day. In the past year, I have only managed to digitize about twenty books and maybe 100 old magazines. At the rate I am going, the project will take many years to accomplish. However, I feel that I have no choice.

I expect to retire in a few years, and I don’t want to think about “downsizing” by moving into smaller living quarters. If I don’t start solving this problem now, I will face a far larger problem within a very few years.

A few years ago, I moved into a Winnebago motor home full time and lived there for two years. During that time, I learned a lot about downsizing!

I later sold the motor home and purchased a second home in the sunbelt where I can spend my winters without shoveling snow or worrying about falling on ice and breaking a hip, such as a friend of mine did last winter. Life is great in the sunshine!

However, this move creates two new problems. The first is a repeat of the problem I mentioned earlier: my winter home is small, and I don’t have room for hundreds of books and magazines. The second problem is unique to the sunshine states: there is no basement! Where am I going to save all those printed books?

The biggest problem of all, however, still remains the same:  there is no way I can duplicate everything on paper and keep duplicate copies in each home!

The primary reasons that I have not yet been able to scan many books and magazines are: (1.) time required and (2.) the speed of the scanner. The first scanner I purchased is a great device, but it was never designed for speed. It can only scan one side of one page at a time. I need something faster and something that has an input tray that will accept a stack of pages and will scan both sides of each page automatically.

Fujitsu sheet feed scanner

To address this problem, I went out and purchased a sheet-feed scanner. I can insert up to 50 pages at a time, push a button, and relax for about a minute while the scanner digitizes both sides of every page and then deposits all the pages in an output tray. I check the electronic scan to make sure it worked properly, and then I throw away the paper.

GASP!

Yes, I throw away the paper. As a long-time genealogist, I am used to saving every scrap of paper. However, I soon realized that this was no longer necessary when I had a duplicate copy of everything, a copy that is easier to search than paper. Once digitized, almost all the pages go into the trash bin or into the shredder.

Copyrights

I believe there are no copyright issues involved, even with the newly-published material. I am making copies solely for my personal use and have no plans to ever share any of the newer books and magazines in digital format with anyone else. Current U.S. copyright laws allow for making copies for one’s personal use, and I think most other countries have similar provisions. I can legally share electronic copies of out-of-copyright printed books, but anything that still falls under copyright laws will always be used solely for my own personal use.

The Process

I must admit that I had emotional difficulties when I first cut the pages out of some of my “valuable” books. That is, those that I felt were valuable, regardless of their actual replacement cost. Cutting pages out of the New England Historic and Genealogical Register or out of that family surname book that I paid $150 to purchase years ago is a gut-wrenching experience. Even tougher is the prospect of throwing the pages out in the trash after they have been scanned. However, I really feel I have no choice: I cannot afford the storage space. The emotions subside after cutting apart the first three or four books.

One trick that I learned recently concerns the many out-of-copyright, reprinted books that I own. Before cutting them apart, I first look on Google Books and at the Internet Archive and then search on Google to see if someone else has already scanned a copy of the same book and made it available online. If so, I simply go to the appropriate web site, find the electronic version of the book, click on DOWNLOAD PDF, and save the entire book to my hard drive. Then I simply throw away the printed book that I have. If someone else has already scanned the book, there is no need for me to duplicate the other person’s effort!

Local libraries don’t seem to want these cut-apart books; they already have space problems of their own and are already throwing away lesser-used books by the hundreds. The last thing they want is more old books, especially if the book is already available in electronic format. Major genealogy libraries typically don’t want the books either as they usually already have copies of the books that I am digitizing.

So far, about half of the out-of-copyright books that I have checked have been found in The Internet Archive, in Google Books, or in at least one of the other online web sites specializing in out-of-copyright books.

e-book-1209040_640

There are a handful of books that I will never cut apart: the family Bible printed in 1828, the signed autobiography of Lorenzo Dow published in 1838, my high school yearbook, and a very few others. However, the remainder of them are being sliced. I don’t hesitate to slice reprinted books or any magazines. I have an Exacto knife for the purpose. I plan to purchase a paper cutter some day but my present method with an Exacto knife seems sufficient for now.

I refer to this process as “meeting the guillotine.”

Magazines

I have converted most of my magazine subscriptions to e-subscriptions. Don’t send me paper! For the few subscriptions that are not available in electronic format, I now read the printed magazine for the first time WHILE I am cutting the pages apart and feeding them into the scanner.

Which scanner should I use?

For a while I thought about purchasing a bunch of scanners and evaluating them in a side-by-side comparison article in this newsletter. I soon gave up on that idea because (1.) there are a lot of scanners available, and comparing would be both expensive and time consuming. Also, (2.) it’s already been done!

If you are thinking about purchasing a new scanner, I would suggest you first look at The Best Scanners of 2020 in the PCMag web site at https://www.pcmag.com/picks/the-best-scanners. It is a great comparison of most of the leading scanners of today and is updated annually.

Preservation

Obviously, I also have to make sure these documents are well preserved in their digital format. Can you imagine the emotions if I spent hundreds of hours scanning several hundred old books and then threw the originals away, only to have a hard drive crash?

In fact, I keep a MINIMUM of four copies: the original copy is kept in the Macintosh’s hard drive; a backup copy is kept on a 12-terabyte external hard drive that plugs into the Mac’s USB connector; a second backup copy is kept on various USB “jump drives” and a third backup copy is kept on an off-site backup service “in the cloud” on the Internet that automatically backs up any new files or newly-changed files from the Mac’s hard drive once every fifteen minutes.

Right now I am also keeping a fourth copy on my laptop computer and a fifth copy on another computer in my office by using a middle-of-the-night process that automatically copies files across my in-home network.

Every spring and every fall, before moving to my other seasonal home, I also make backups of everything to another USB hard drive and take the new backups to the computers at the other location. I guess that is a sixth copy. I can even carry my entire digital library in a rather small briefcase, backpack, or gym bag. I no longer need the multiple bookshelves or the cardboard boxes of books in the basement.

no_uhaulIf I was to carry my entire library when it was all in print, I would be renting a large U-Haul van twice a year!

I am not sure if I will continue with the fourth, fifth, and sixth copies, however. If those disk drives fill up, I might reconsider the process. A “belt and suspenders” approach is a good idea, but I am not sure that I need three belts and three sets of suspenders! I make fourth, fifth, and sixth copies right now simply because I happen to have the disk space available.

flashdriveThere is an unexpected side benefit: the jump drives (also called flash drives) slip into a pocket and are barely noticeable there. When I go to genealogy conferences, to a library, to a courthouse, or to a cousin’s home, I am carrying my digitized library with me. My present 265-gigabyte jump drive has sufficient space to store thousands of books and magazines. Someday I will have my entire library with me in my pocket, although that might require two or three jump drives at today’s technology. On the other hand, jump drive capacity is likely to continue growing faster than I can scan old books. If I want to check a book or magazine that is in my home library, I can pull a jump drive out of my pocket, insert it into my laptop or a friend’s computer or even at a computer at a public library, and check on it quickly. In contrast, can you imagine carrying around an entire library of printed books and magazines?

If copyright laws allow, I can even provide legal copies of an entire book to a friend by simply clicking and dragging a file onto my friend’s computer or by sending it to him or her in e-mail. I can legally do so with the out-of-copyright books that I own.

Full disclosure: This is still a “work in progress.” While I have already digitized a lot of books and magazines, I am probably only about 50% complete. Each summer, when I am living in the “house up north,” I digitize more books that are still in boxes or in the bookshelves. I plan to never take boxes of books or multiple bookcases to the home in the sun belt. It is so much easier to read the books on a laptop or a tablet computer!

Summation

Converting one’s library to all digital files can be a gut-wrenching task. Admittedly, slicing “valuable” books is an emotional challenge. However, once the available physical storage space is used up, one is left with few choices.

How do you store your collection of books and magazines? Do you have them all neatly stored and organized? Can you find what you want quickly? How about future purchases? Where will you put those? Can you carry all of them with you on a trip? And what if you move? There’s a saying that “you can’t take it with you,” but you might be able to keep your printed resources for as long as you need them – and make them much more useful – if you convert them to digital files.

Connect to the FamilySearch LiveStream Each Week

FamilySearch posted Connect While Social Distancing: Join the FamilySearch Live Community on 23 March 2020 but I missed it, and have not taken advantage of it.

I received this note from Paul Nauta of FamilySearch today:

==============================================

I hope you and your loved ones are faring well with the repercussions of the COVID-19 pandemic. I wanted to let you know FamilySearch has been exploring some fun and interesting ways to help individuals, families, and friends connect and deal with this difficult period of home confinements and social distancing. 

Since you like to keep up with the latest trends, I thought you’d like to know about two of our latest developments.  

First, FamilySearch.org/Together is a new, growing resource of free, fun, personal and family activities to consider. Check it out. 

Second, FamilySearch has been holding dynamic livestreams on its social media (FamilySearch Facebook and FamilySearch Instagram).  

If you’ve missed any of the past events, you can catch up by watching them on the FamilySearch YouTube playlist

FamilySearch livestreams help our patrons connect on social media and invite others to be a part of a vibrant community to learn, share, and support each other during this time of isolation and increased social media consumption. The livestreams deliver warm, welcoming, and informative content from FamilySearch featuring new guests every week.  

We invite you to be more connected with FamilySearch and an online community that shares your  interests in family history and making new family discoveries. 

 The livestreams will occur three times a week for the foreseeable future. You can find them on Instagram on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 11 a.m. MDT, and Facebook every Wednesday at 4 p.m. MDT.  
  •   Instagram Tuesday guests focus on connecting with living family members, storytelling, and the importance of journaling and record keeping during this unusual time. 
  •   Instagram Thursday features guests from FamilySearch. They share tips and tricks and answer patron questions live. 
  •   FaceBook Wednesdays are primarily focused on product and research tips and are targeted for a more advanced family history audience.  


  Please join us and feel free to share this information with others.  
===============================================

The URL for this post is:

Copyright (c) 2020, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the “Comments” link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Mini-Myrt’s Great Face Mask Sew In

DearREADERS,
We’re going to host a special 20-minute Mini-Myrt at noon Eastern on Thurs, 26 Mar 2020 to be known as the Great Face Mask Sew In. Thanks to Kathy who inspired us, we will go through the directions provided by Joann Fabrics & Crafts here: https://www.joann.com/how-to-make-a-face-mask/042188731P321.html

Here’s the link for first time Mini-Myrt registrants: https://bit.ly/minimyrt

I’ll will be using fabrics from Ol’ Myrt’s stash. Why? Our local Joann’s had given out all kits out for the day, were short staffed and couldn’t make more at the time Mr. Myrt stopped by. 

Luckily the store’s website also provided a link https://youtu.be/VgHrnS6n4iA to the YouTube video embedded below. Please take Michelle D’s response to the project to heart. 

For our Great Face Mask Sew In, I’ll have signs to label the measurements so you won’t need to rely on the audio for directions. I’ll also have several in progress, to speed up the demonstration process.

CHALLENGE
I hereby challenge everyone with a sewing machine to make 5 masks each. You can do it! And to keep track of our efforts, here a link to a shared Google Sheet where you may enter your name and number created, updating as necessary from time to time. You’ll need:

  • 9×12 inch fabric
  • 9×12 inch flannel or interfacing
  • 7 inch length of elastic X 2 (one for each ear)
  • thread
  • straight pins
  • sewing machine
  • iron & board or pad

Here’s the link to the Google Sheet for reporting the number of masks donated:
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1ReVnfWeNer3pICkYnLQK6qPmQXyVMZPldW1_hkg2MnA/edit?usp=sharing

Donate the masks to your local Joann’s store, which will in turn give these to local hospitals.

If you value the interactive genealogy education provided in DearMYRTLE webinars, please consider donating. THANK-YOU in advance.

paypal.me/DearMYRTLE


Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     🙂
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE

Second Life: Clarise Beaumont

http://www.facebook.com/groups/DearMYRTLE
https://www.facebook.com/groups/organizedgenealogist


Announcing $20 off all New Memberships from American Ancestors and New England Historic Genealogical Society

The following announcement was written by American Ancestors / New England Historic Genealogical Society:

American Ancestors and NEHGS, America’s founding genealogical organization, has announced a special discount on new memberships during the month of April 2020. Given the unprecedented global health crisis, with individuals remaining at home, the organization is offering a $20 discount on any new annual membership for a limited time to encourage others to engage in the rewarding activity of researching family history. Throughout April, the cost of a new, individual, annual membership has been reduced to $74.95.

American Ancestors and New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) is the nation’s most comprehensive resource for family history research. Members have access to expert family history services through the organization’s staff, original published scholarship, its data-rich website at AmericanAncestors.org, outstanding online educational opportunities, and a state-of-the-art research center located in downtown Boston, Mass. American Ancestors helps family historians of all levels explore their past and understand their families’ unique place in history.

An annual, individual membership with American Ancestors includes:

  • Access to more than 1.4 billion searchable names on AmericanAncestors.org
  • Quarterly delivery of the magazine American Ancestors and the flagship journal of American genealogy, the Register
  • $20/hour discounts on research-for-hire and consultations
  • 10% discount on books published by NEHGS (some restrictions and exclusions apply)
  • Free admission to the NEHGS library in Boston, Mass., and special collections
  • The Weekly Genealogist e-newsletter
  • Free access to the NEHGS Ask-a-Genealogist service
  • Savings of up to 30% off the best available rate at participating hotels reserved through HistoricHotels.org and HistoricHotelsWorldWide.com
  • Standard access to American AncesTREES, an online family tree program

This special offer is available from American Ancestors through April 30, 2020. It may be purchased online at AmericanAncestors.org/april20off or by contacting the Member Services Division at membership@nehgs.org or by telephone at 888-296-3447.