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Saturday Night Genealogy Fun — Your Number One Songs

Calling all Genea-Musings Fans: 

 It’s Saturday Night again – 

time for some more Genealogy Fun!!


Here is your assignment, should you decide to accept it (you ARE reading this, so I assume that you really want to play along – cue the Mission Impossible music!):

Tonight, we’re going to go down memory lane a bit.

1)  What was the #1 song on the day you were born?  Or on your birthday when you were 15?  When you were 18?  Or when you married?  Or some other important date in your life.

2)  Go to http://www.thisdayinmusic.com/birthdayno1 and enter the date and select from UK, US or Australia record lists.  Note:  the first date available is 1 January 1946. 

Alternatively, go to Wikipedia.org and search for “number one songs in yyyy” (insert your year) and enter the month and date and see a list of number one songs for each year since 1940. 

3)  Tell us what your results are (If you are sensitive about your age, don’t list the date or year… ) on a blog post of your own, a comment to this post, or in a Facebook status line or note. 


Here’s mine:


*  Birth date 23 October 1943:

From the Wikipedia site, #1 on that date was “Sunday, Monday or Always” by Bing Crosby (lyrics only, couldn’t find a video or recording online)

*  Age 15 on 23 October 1958:

From the This Day in Music site, #1 was “It’s All in the Game” by Tommy Edwards (YouTube video)

*  Age 15 on 23 October 1961:

From the This Day in Music site, #1 was “Runaround Sue” by Dion. (YouTube video)

*  Married on 21 March 1970:

From the This Day in Music site, #1 was “Bridge Over Troubled Water” by Simon & Garfunkel (YouTube video)

*  During the time that I was really “into” popular music (1956-1970), the #1 hits on my birthday were:

**  1956. Don’t Be Cruel/Hound Dog — Elvis Presley
**  1957.  Jailhouse Rock/Treat Me Nice — Elvis Presley
**  1958.  It’s All in the Game — Tommy Edwards
**  1959.  Mack the Knife — Bobby Darin
**  1960.  I Want to be Wanted — Brenda Lee

**  1961.  Runaround Sue — Dion
**  1962.  Monster Mash — Bobby Boris Pickett & the Crypt Kickers
**  1963.  Sugar Shack — Jimmy Gilmer & the Fireballs
**  1964.  Do Wah Diddy — Manfred Mann
**  1965.  Yesterday — The Beatles

**  1966.  96 Tears — ?? & the Mysterians
**  1967.  To Sir, with Love — Lulu
**  1968.  Hey Jude — The Beatles
**  1969.  Sugar, Sugar — The Archies
**  1970.  I’ll Be There — The Jackson Five

*  I had never heard of the Bing Crosby song – here are the lyrics:

Sunday, Monday or Tuesday
Wednesday, Thursday or Friday
I want you near
Every day in the year

Oh, won’t you tell me when
We will meet again
Sunday, Monday or always

If you’re satisfied
I’ll be at your side
Sunday, Monday or always

No need to tell me now
What makes the world go ’round
When at the sight of you
My heart begins to pound and pound

And what am I to do
Can’t I be with you
Sunday, Monday or always

Always and forever I must be with you
Beginning Sunday and Monday and then forever

Oh, won’t you tell me when
We will meet again
Sunday, Monday or always

If you’re satisfied
I’ll be at your side
Sunday, Monday or always

No need to tell me now
What makes the world go ’round
When at the sight of you
My heart begins to pound, pound, pound

What am I to do
Can’t I be with you
Sunday, Monday or always?


I wonder if my parents sang this around the time I was born?


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The URL for this post is: 

Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the “Comments” link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

David Bradlee: “Windows broke when I got there”

We’ve come to the last of the men George Gailer sued for tarring and feathering him in October 1769, the man his legal filing identified as a “Taylor” named “David Bradley.”

As it happens, David Bradlee was one of the first individuals in Boston I dug into, about twenty years ago. I wrote a short article about him for the Bostonian Society newsletter then.

Bradlee hasn’t made a lot of appearances on Boston 1775, but I may have been saving him for the Sestercentennial of when his political activity started to appear in the historical record.

David Bradlee was born in Dorchester on 24 Nov 1742, according to Samuel Bradlee Doggett’s History of the Bradlee Family (1878). David was the sixth child and third son in the family, and two more boys followed. Most moved into Boston.

Bradlee became a tailor. On 22 Mar 1764 he married Sarah Watts of Chelsea. Doggett said her father was a judge, but Mellen Chamberlin’s Documentary History of Chelsea shows she was a daughter of Richard Watts, Harvard 1739, innkeeper and militia captain. His father was the judge—Samuel Watts, justice of the peace, member of the Massachusetts General Court and the Council. In other words, David Bradlee married up in society.

David and Sarah Bradlee’s first son arrived on 20 October, or seven months after their marriage. That baby received the name David Watts Bradlee. The couple then had Sarah (1766), Samuel and Mary (twins in 1768, but Mary died at nine months), and eventually another Mary (1770).

As I’ve written, it’s not clear why George Gailer named David Bradlee as one of the people who attacked him on 28 Oct 1769. I’m assuming Bradlee really was involved in assaulting the sailor in some way. But Bradlee had the connections to secure John Adams as his attorney. He and his fellow defendants eventually won their case on default, and he paid Adams 19s.4d.

Well before that lawsuit was resolved, however, Bradlee was present at another riot and involved into another court case about it. He was on the scene on 22 Feb 1770 when Customs officer Ebenezer Richardson shot into a crowd of boys and young men mobbing his house, killing little Christopher Seider.

Robert Treat Paine’s notes on the Richardson trial summarize Bradlee’s eyewitness testimony this way:

Windows broke when I got there. I saw 3 or 4 Stones come out of the Window. I saw one or two Men in the Room with Guns in their hands. R put a Gun on edge of Window. I heard the Gun, and run to the back of the house. R clapt the Gun at me.

In this case, the word “clapt” seems to mean that Richardson had fired a load of powder but no shot at Bradlee—in other words, he fired a blank to scare the man off. Even though Bradlee’s testimony was all about the stones and gunshots coming from inside the house, one has to wonder what he was doing so close to that house to provoke Richardson’s action.

TOMORROW: Two weeks later.

Seavers in the News — Mrs. Joel Seaver Dies in New York in 1907

It’s time for another edition of “Seavers in the News” – a weekly feature from the historical newspapers about persons with the surname Seaver that are interesting, useful, mysterious, fun, macabre, or add information to my family tree database.

This week’s entry is from the Burlington [Vt.] Free Press newspaper dated 25 December 1907:

The transcription of the article is:

“DEATH OF MRS. JOEL SEAVER.
(special to the Free Press)

“Malone, N.Y., Dec. 24 — Mrs. Joel J. Seaver, wife of the late Colonel Seaver, died at her home of her son this afternoon after a brief illness, aged 62 years.  Mrs. Seaver has one son, Herbert H., assistant cashier of the People’s National bank of Malone; and two stepsons, Frederick J. Seaver, private secretary to State Bank Superintendent Clark Williams at Albany, and Albert Seaver, who is in the employ of the Japanese government.  Her husband was for many years a close personal friend of the late Vice-President William A. Wheeler, and one of the original founders and owners of the Malone Palladium.”

The source citation is:

“Death of Mrs. Joel Seaver,” The Burlington [Vt.] Free Press newspaper, obituary, Wednesday, 25 December 1907, page 2, column 1, Mrs. Joel Seaver obituaryNewspapers.com   (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 14 November 2019).

This is another obituary where the subject’s first name and maiden name are not mentioned.  The death date is 24 December 1907 in Malone, New York, and she is 62 years old, so she was probably born in 1845.  The obituary does provide her son’s name and occupation, and her two step-sons names and occupations.
Her husband’s name is prominently given, and he is called “Colonel” so was probably an officer in the Civil War.  He was also a friend of a former Vice-President of the United States.  
Joel Joshua Seaver (1822-1899) was born in Salisbury, Vermont, the son of Joshua and Betsey (Bigelow) Seaver.  He married (1) Ann Eliza Brown (1824-1869) in Malone in 1849, and they had two sons, Frederick and Albert.  Joel Seaver married (2) Mary Elizabeth Hadley (1845-1907), and they had one son, Herbert. 
The subject of this obituary is the second wife, Mary Elizabeth (Hadley) Seaver. 
Joel Joshua Seaver is my 2nd cousin 5 times removed, and his three sons are my 3rd cousins 4 times removed.  I wonder if there is an obituary for him, since he seems to have led an eventful life.  YES!! There is one in the New York Times in 1899.
There are over 8,000 Seaver “stories” in my family tree – this was one of them.   Life happens, accidentally and intentionally, and sometimes the life of a person is memorialized in an obituary without her given forename or maiden surname.  I am glad I can honor Mary Elizabeth (Hadley) Seaver today.

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Disclosure:  I have a paid subscription to Newspapers.com and have used it extensively to find articles about my ancestral and one-name families.


The URL for this post is:   

Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the “Comments” link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook,  or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


Monday Genea-Pourri – Week Ending 10 November 2019

Here are the highlights of my family history and genealogy related activities over the past week:

1)  Attended the Chula Vista Genealogical Society board meeting on Wednesday, and reported on the Newsletter, Research Group, and DNA Interest Group.  Wrote, edited and published via email the CVGS Newsletter for November 2019.  I will print and mail the postal copies on Tuesday. 
2)  Participated in Mondays With Myrt today.  The panel discussed Remembrance Day, Veterans Day, 1940s occupation of Norway, Pat’s map issue, Dave’s computer problems, backup and cloud storage, photos of ancestors who served, and the Sayre talk on Soldiers homes.  I contributed only to the photos with my post Veterans Day 2017 – Honoring My Heroes.


4)  Wrote and posted a biographical sketch of 7th great-grandfather #514 Samuel Rayment (1679-1724) for my 52 Ancestors biographical sketch on Friday.  


6) There were several sessions working in the RootsMagic software program to match with and update FamilySearch Family Tree profiles for Seaver families and my ancestral families, with occasional additions to the RootsMagic profiles. I have matched 33,469 of my RootsMagic persons with FSFT.

7)  Used Web Hints and Record Matches from Ancestry, MyHeritage, Findmypast and FamilySearch to add content and sources to my RootsMagic profiles.  I now have 55,335 persons in my RootsMagic file, and 111,669 source citations.   I TreeShared once this week updating 155 profiles, and I resolved 241 Ancestry Hints.  I’ve fallen behind on the Ancestry Record Hints with 121,955 to be resolved, but I work on them weekly.  

8)  Added the ThruLines for three AncestryDNA matches with “Common Ancestors.”  Researched the ancestry of one of the Brigham cousins to see if there were any common ancestors other than the Brighams.  There weren’t, but some lines are not complete.

9) Wrote 20 Genea-Musings blog posts last week, of which two were press releases.  The most popular post last week was Don Created a Wonderful Genealogy Website on TNG  with over 317 views.


                              =============================================


The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the “Comments” link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


AncestryDNA Whips Past 4 Million Samples

AncestryDNA Reaches 4 Million Customers in DNA Database.Four million. It’s staggering, really. AncestryDNA has exceeded four million samples in its DNA database!

It took AncestryDNA three years to get the first million samples. (See “AncestryDNA Exceeds Million Mark” on my blog on 22 July 2015.)

It took them 11 months to reach two million. (See “AncestryDNA Database Reaches Two Million” on 28 June 2016.)

It took just seven months to get to the three million mark. (See “AncestryDNA Zips Past 3 Million Samples” on 19 January 2017.)

Less than 4 months later, AncestryDNA has reached four million persons in the DNA database. (See “AncestryDNA Reaches 4 Million Customers in DNA Database” on the Ancestry blog, 27 April 2017.) AncestryDNA must be selling over 8,000 kits a day to grow that fast. Ancestry says as many people took their DNA test during that period as got married in the United States. They said “that’s about as fast as babies are born in the United States.”

That’s astonishing.

Genealogy News Bytes – Tuesday, 5 November 2019


Some of the genealogy news and education items across my monitor the last four days include:






2)  New or Updated Record Collections:





3)  Genealogy Education – Webinars (times are US Pacific):

 GeneaWebinars Calendar



*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar – Tuesday, 5 November, 5 p.m.:  Trove: An Australian and Beyond Genealogical Treasure, by Helen V. Smith

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar – Wednesday, 6 November, 11 a.m.: Understanding Ethnicity Estimates, by Mary Eberle

4)  Genealogy Education – Podcasts:



*  Fisher’s Top Tips: #125r – Repeating Names

5)  Genealogy Videos (YouTube):

*  BYU Family history Library:  Family Search Genealogies by Ann Tanner








6)  Genealogy Bargains:


7)  Did you miss the last Genealogy News Bytes – 1 November 2019?

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Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the “Comments” link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Announcing: DearMYRTLE’s new blog "Myrt’s Musings"

DearREADERS,

Yup! I’ve taken the plunge and designed a new blog called Myrt’s Musings. It will include all the news, hangouts announcements and opinionated moderating my DearREADERS have come to expect.

So head on over to


Frankly, I’ve had a ball experimenting with Wordpress. After consulting with 3 experts, we realize its impossible to import my old DearMYRTLE’s Genealogy Blog posts over without a ton of broken links. It had something to do with a custom domain redirect. Yikes!


Yes, I love Blogger, but I’m loving Wordpress, too. 

That sounds like a line from a country western song.


P.S. Genea-friend and fellow GeneaBloggerTRIBE member Randy Seaver of Genea-Musings said it’s ok if Ol’ Myrt here uses the word “musings.” I’m guessing he doesn’t have a copyright on the use of that word.

P. P. S. – I’ve got a whole new color scheme. Wonder if that means I’ll need to make a new quilt backdrop for our upcoming hangouts? Hmmmm.

Happy family tree climbing!

Hangouts: Pay what you want. So it’s simple. If you value the work Ol’ Myrt, +Cousin Russ and our beloved panelists do week in and week out on your behalf, please:

Check the DearMYRTLE Hangouts Calendar for upcoming study groups and hangouts. There you’ll find links to the GeneaConference (in-person) and the GeneaWebinars Calendar with over over 200 hours of online genealogy classes, webinars, live streams and
tweetchats from other hosts and presenters over the next 12 months.

“A young Lad (belonging to the Office) fir’d a Gun”

The report of someone inside John Mein and John Fleeming’s print shop firing a gun at Boston’s first tar-and-feathers procession on 28 Oct 1769 raises a number of questions.

First is the matter of how many guns were involved. Edes and Gill’s Boston Gazette reported “a Gun was fired from thence and two others snap’d at them [i.e., someone fired blank shots] just as they got by.” However, the pro-governor Boston News-Letter stated simply that “a Gun was fired from one of the Windows.” So was there one shot or three?

A Crown informant named George Mason reported this version of events:

As soon as the Mob had got as far as Mr. Meins Printing Office and dwelling House (which is near Liberty Tree) they made a Halt, and as I’m very credibly informed endeavour’d to force the Door (I’m certain of this they broke the Windows) upon which a young Lad (belonging to the Office) fir’d a Gun loaded with nothing but Powder with a view to intimidate them from any further violence, this had not the desired effect, for immediately after they recover’d from their fright, they burst the Door open in earnest, and likewise forc’d the Locks and Doors of the inner appartments in search of Mein. Some mischief was done to his Books &c and two Guns were taken away by Persons in the Neighborhood who are well known to Mr. Meins Servants

The Boston Gazette stated: “they bro’t off three Guns, two of them well charg’d, as Evidence.” So it looks like both sides agree that at least one shot was fired, the crowd confiscated at least two guns, and no one was injured.

The next question is who fired that shot. Mason identified the shooter as “a young Lad (belonging to the Office)”—i.e., a printer’s apprentice or devil. The newspapers said the crowd found no one inside the house, so Mason apparently had inside information.

Isaiah Thomas wrote later that Nathaniel Mills was an apprentice to John Fleeming. He was a week shy of twenty years old during this riot, however, and therefore probably not still considered a “young Lad.”

Another possibility, though I’ve found no direct evidence, was John Howe (1754-1835). He had just turned fifteen in October 1769, still too young for militia service. I can’t show that he worked for Fleeming, but he did become a Sandemanian, and Fleeming was the only Boston printer of that faith. If I were writing a historical novel, I’d put young Howe into that building.

The Boston Gazette report is clear that the shot from the print shop caused people in the procession to break in. Mason’s account says the opposite: when members of the crowd “endeavour’d to force the Door,” a frightened boy inside fired the gun. Both sides had every reason to present themselves as the party under threat, indeed many incentives to think of themselves as the party under threat, so I don’t see any way to work that out.

It’s notable that the Boston Gazette made no mention at all of the merchants’ confrontation with John Mein earlier in the day. That makes that paper’s claim that someone fired a gun “for what Reason we know not, as no injury seemed designed them,” more than a little disingenuous. When the whole town was buzzing that your boss, already unpopular, had fired a pistol recklessly in public and was being hunted by the authorities, you could reasonably worry about being injured.

The Boston Post-Boy also declined to report in detail on the confrontation with Mein in its 30 October issue, saying, “as we are informed a Warrant has been issued upon the Occasion, we do not think it proper at present to give a particular relation of the Circumstances of that Affair.” That looks like a cop-out, but at least those printers gave a legal reason.

One last observation about the gunshot from the printing office: this was the third instance of gunfire in Boston in one week of October 1769. There would be more, most memorably in late February and early March of 1770. In all those cases, the shots were fired by employees or supporters of the Crown. Not until late 1774, as the Massachusetts Government Act provoked violence against mandamus Councilors, did any Whig or Patriot fire at a supporter of the royal government. (It’s not clear what James Otis, Jr., was shooting at when he fired out his windows in April 1770.)

That pattern reflects how the Crown supporters were heavily outnumbered. The soldiers marching home from the Neck on 24 October were under assault from a crowd, albeit one trying to enforce a writ. Four days later, John Mein was surrounded by a crowd. The young lad inside Mein’s office apparently felt threatened by a crowd. Months later, Ebenezer Richardson saw his house being attacked, and Pvt. Edward Montgomery had just been knocked down by something thrown from a mob when he shouted to his fellow soldiers to shoot on 5 Mar 1770.

Firing a single-shot musket without a bayonet was a desperate move. It raised the level of violence and the anger of the other side while leaving the shooter essentially defenseless for the next minute at least. Those gunshots show how desperate some Bostonians were feeling.

COMING UP: George Gailer’s experience.

Added and Updated Record Collections at FamilySearch.org – Week of 27 October to 2 November 2019

I am trying to keep up with the new and updated record collections at FamilySearch   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/list) every week.

As of 2 November 2019, there were 2,642 historical record collections on FamilySearch (an increase of 2 from last week):

The added or updated collections this week are (from the FamilySearch listing):

Alabama Deaths, 1908-19741,875,610Nov 1, 2019

===========================================

In order to select a specific record collection on FamilySearch, go to  https://familysearch.org/search/collection/list and use the “Filter by collection name” feature in the upper left-hand corner and use keywords (e.g. “church england”) to find collections with those keywords.

Each one of the collections listed above has a Research Wiki page (use the “Learn more” link).  It would be very useful if the Wiki page for each collection listed the dates for when the collection was added as a new collection and the dates for major updates also.

=============================================

The URL for this post is:  


Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the “Comments” link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


Announcing: DearMYRTLE’s new blog "Myrt’s Musings"

DearREADERS,

Yup! I’ve taken the plunge and designed a new blog called Myrt’s Musings. It will include all the news, hangouts announcements and opinionated moderating my DearREADERS have come to expect.

So head on over to


Frankly, I’ve had a ball experimenting with Wordpress. After consulting with 3 experts, we realize its impossible to import my old DearMYRTLE’s Genealogy Blog posts over without a ton of broken links. It had something to do with a custom domain redirect. Yikes!


Yes, I love Blogger, but I’m loving Wordpress, too. 

That sounds like a line from a country western song.


P.S. Genea-friend and fellow GeneaBloggerTRIBE member Randy Seaver of Genea-Musings said it’s ok if Ol’ Myrt here uses the word “musings.” I’m guessing he doesn’t have a copyright on the use of that word.

P. P. S. – I’ve got a whole new color scheme. Wonder if that means I’ll need to make a new quilt backdrop for our upcoming hangouts? Hmmmm.

Happy family tree climbing!

Hangouts: Pay what you want. So it’s simple. If you value the work Ol’ Myrt, +Cousin Russ and our beloved panelists do week in and week out on your behalf, please:

Check the DearMYRTLE Hangouts Calendar for upcoming study groups and hangouts. There you’ll find links to the GeneaConference (in-person) and the GeneaWebinars Calendar with over over 200 hours of online genealogy classes, webinars, live streams and
tweetchats from other hosts and presenters over the next 12 months.