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Monthly Archives:

Back at George Washington High

Last month I wrote about the controversy over murals at George Washington High School in San Francisco.

Those murals, painted by Victor Arnautoff as a New Deal project, depicted the life of George Washington without hagiography. Arnautoff devoted space to the oppression of slavery and the human cost of westward expansion. But showing subservient African-Americans and dead Native Americans raised objections from some students in the 1960s and today.

This spring, the San Francisco Board of Education voted unanimously to budget $600,000 to permanently conceal the murals, most likely with a new coat of paint. People thought that money would cover an environmental study of the plan, the work itself, and anticipated legal battles.

News of the decision attracted attention across the country. The school was opened for public viewing this summer. Many artistic figures joined local preservationists and alumni in opposing the decision. Some fans of the murals started to organize a public vote to keep them. The board president and vice president defended their decision to, in their words, do away with “art that for more than 80 years has traumatized students.” There were few additional voices for removing the murals, however.

This month, the San Francisco school board took a second vote. By the slight margin of 4–3, they decided “to obscure the art with panels or similar materials rather than painting over it.” That would allow the panels to be taken off at some future time. Back in the spring, this remedy was expected to cost much more than the painting, but quite possibly the board had come to anticipate more legal costs.

Or perhaps the first vote was a strategy to test the fervency of the two sides. The Board of Education’s president controls its agenda. The San Francisco Chronicle quoted the current president saying he “always supported obscuring the mural rather than destroying it, although he voted to paint over it in June.” He doesn’t plan to allow a third vote during his term, which ends in December.

The school year will start soon. Given how municipal contracts work, I have no sense of how quickly the project of covering the murals will progress. At some point the board will choose its next president, and in 2020 the city’s voting public will elect a new Board of Education. The referendum on the murals appears to be still up in the air. This whole controversy could rise again—or quietly subside for another few decades.

Review: Unofficial Ancestry.com Workbook

Unofficial Ancestry.com Workbook: A How-to Manual for Tracing Your Family Tree on the #1 Genealogy WebsiteSomehow I missed the release of the Unofficial Guide to Ancestry.com by Nancy Hendrickson. When I reviewed Unofficial Guide to FamilySearch.org, I became a big fan of Family Tree Book’s unofficial series, so I was very happy when I received a review copy of the new Ancestry book, Unofficial Ancestry.com Workbook: A How-to Manual for Tracing Your Family Tree on the #1 Genealogy Website.

Chapters are organized around record types. The chapters of the book are:

  1. Search and the Card Catalog
  2. Census Records
  3. Birth, Marriage, and Death Records
  4. Military Records
  5. Immigration Records
  6. Historical Maps, Images, Newspapers, and Publications
  7. Social History [directories, tax records, land records, histories, etc.]
  8. AncestryDNA

Each chapter contains overviews of the databases of the chapter’s record type and helpful instructions on using that type. For example, from the vital records chapter:

Death records can open up new lines of research, primarily because they can contain the name of the person’s parents (including the mother’s maiden name) as well as where the parents and the decedent were born.

Each chapter has a number of exercises. Don’t think workbook quizzes; think step-by-step walkthroughs. 

Each chapter also contains some helpful “search strategies” for the chapter’s record type. Here is an example search strategy from the census chapter:

Don’t assume your ancestor was skipped during an enumeration. Look for alternate surname spellings, first name shown as initials, or location in a neighboring county.

Each chapter contains workbook forms and worksheets for things like searching the census and abstracting birth records. Appendices have additional checklists, worksheets, and census abstract forms. While a book obviously isn’t going to contain enough copies of each form or worksheet, additional copies can be downloaded from the Family Tree Magazine website.

 

Unofficial Ancestry.com Workbook: A How-to Manual for Tracing Your Family Tree on the #1 Genealogy Website
Nancy Hendrickson
8.2 x 0.6 x 10.9 inches, 192 pp., paperback. 2017.
ISBN 1440349061
Family Tree Books
1-855-278-0408, shopfamilytree.com
$10.99 Kindle
$13.19 Google eBook
$14.57 Amazon
$21.99 Paperback/eBook list price, plus shipping.

Announcing: DearMYRTLE’s new blog "Myrt’s Musings"

DearREADERS,

Yup! I’ve taken the plunge and designed a new blog called Myrt’s Musings. It will include all the news, hangouts announcements and opinionated moderating my DearREADERS have come to expect.

So head on over to


Frankly, I’ve had a ball experimenting with Wordpress. After consulting with 3 experts, we realize its impossible to import my old DearMYRTLE’s Genealogy Blog posts over without a ton of broken links. It had something to do with a custom domain redirect. Yikes!


Yes, I love Blogger, but I’m loving Wordpress, too. 

That sounds like a line from a country western song.


P.S. Genea-friend and fellow GeneaBloggerTRIBE member Randy Seaver of Genea-Musings said it’s ok if Ol’ Myrt here uses the word “musings.” I’m guessing he doesn’t have a copyright on the use of that word.

P. P. S. – I’ve got a whole new color scheme. Wonder if that means I’ll need to make a new quilt backdrop for our upcoming hangouts? Hmmmm.

Happy family tree climbing!

Hangouts: Pay what you want. So it’s simple. If you value the work Ol’ Myrt, +Cousin Russ and our beloved panelists do week in and week out on your behalf, please:

Check the DearMYRTLE Hangouts Calendar for upcoming study groups and hangouts. There you’ll find links to the GeneaConference (in-person) and the GeneaWebinars Calendar with over over 200 hours of online genealogy classes, webinars, live streams and
tweetchats from other hosts and presenters over the next 12 months.

Announcing: DearMYRTLE’s new blog "Myrt’s Musings"

DearREADERS,

Yup! I’ve taken the plunge and designed a new blog called Myrt’s Musings. It will include all the news, hangouts announcements and opinionated moderating my DearREADERS have come to expect.

So head on over to


Frankly, I’ve had a ball experimenting with Wordpress. After consulting with 3 experts, we realize its impossible to import my old DearMYRTLE’s Genealogy Blog posts over without a ton of broken links. It had something to do with a custom domain redirect. Yikes!


Yes, I love Blogger, but I’m loving Wordpress, too. 

That sounds like a line from a country western song.


P.S. Genea-friend and fellow GeneaBloggerTRIBE member Randy Seaver of Genea-Musings said it’s ok if Ol’ Myrt here uses the word “musings.” I’m guessing he doesn’t have a copyright on the use of that word.

P. P. S. – I’ve got a whole new color scheme. Wonder if that means I’ll need to make a new quilt backdrop for our upcoming hangouts? Hmmmm.

Happy family tree climbing!

Hangouts: Pay what you want. So it’s simple. If you value the work Ol’ Myrt, +Cousin Russ and our beloved panelists do week in and week out on your behalf, please:

Check the DearMYRTLE Hangouts Calendar for upcoming study groups and hangouts. There you’ll find links to the GeneaConference (in-person) and the GeneaWebinars Calendar with over over 200 hours of online genealogy classes, webinars, live streams and
tweetchats from other hosts and presenters over the next 12 months.

Added and Updated Record Collections at FamilySearch.org – Week of 11 to 17 August 2019

I am trying to keep up with the new and updated record collections at FamilySearch   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/list) every week.

As of 17 August 2019, there were 2,566 historical record collections on FamilySearch (an increase of 27 from last week):

The added or updated collections are (as Marshall provided them):
— Collections Deleted —

Oregon, Oregon State Archives, Marriage Records, 1906-1968      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/3326746); Index only, no images, DELETED 9 Aug 2019

— Collections Added   —

Alaska, World War II Draft Registration Cards,1940-1945 (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2684865); 22,410 indexed records with 22,410 record images, ADDED 14 Aug 2019

Florida, World War II Draft Registration Cards,1940-1945        (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2695955); 536,621 indexed records with 536,621 record images, ADDED 16 Aug 2019

Connecticut, World War II Draft Registration Cards,1940-1945    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2695954); 478,703 indexed records with 478,703 record images, ADDED 14 Aug 2019

Delaware, World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1940-1945      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2515880); 74,179 indexed records with 74,179 record images, ADDED 16 Aug 2019

Idaho, World War II Draft Registration Cards,1940-1945  (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2709446); 138,954 indexed records with 138,954 record images, ADDED 16 Aug 2019

Colorado, World War II Draft Registration Cards,1940-1945       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2515885); 283,562 indexed records with 283,562 record images, ADDED 14 Aug 2019

Nevada, World War II Draft Registration Cards,1940-1945 (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2729393); 35,949 indexed records with 35,949 record images, ADDED 15 Aug 2019

France, Haute-Vienne, Census, 1836      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/3212274); Index only, no images, ADDED 16 Aug 2019

Missouri, World War II Draft Registration Cards,1940-1945       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2759143); 952,820 indexed records with 952,820 record images, ADDED 14 Aug 2019

District of Columbia, World War II Draft Registration Cards,1940-1945   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2548055); 245,072 indexed records with 245,072 record images, ADDED 16 Aug 2019

New Mexico, World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1940-1945    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2548056); 140,702 indexed records with 140,702 record images, ADDED 15 Aug 2019

Virgin Islands, World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1940-1945        (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2517337); 5,625 indexed records with 5,625 record images, ADDED 15 Aug 2019

Arizona, World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1940-1945       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2515876); 141,121 indexed records with 141,121 record images, ADDED 14 Aug 2019

Alabama, World War II Draft Registration Cards,1940-1945        (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2691991); 268,697 indexed records with 268,697 record images, ADDED 14 Aug 2019

United States Census (Slave Schedule), 1860     (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/3161105); Index only, no images, ADDED 16 Aug 2019

California, Los Angeles, Evergreen Memorial Park Cemetery, Deceased Card File Index, 1877-1989  (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/3259479); 4,166 indexed records with 4,166 record images, ADDED 17 Aug 2019

*  Hawaii, World War II Draft Registration Cards,1940-1945 (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2709452); 138,956 indexed records with 138,956 record images, ADDED 16 Aug 2019

England, Cambridge Parish Registers, 1538-1983  (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/3299384); 16 indexed records with 16 record images, ADDED 12 Aug 2019

England, Huntingdonshire Parish Registers       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2340291); 126,104 indexed records with 126,104 record images, ADDED 16 Aug 2019

Maryland, World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1940-1945      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2568865); 532,405 indexed records with 532,405 record images, ADDED 16 Aug 2019

Minnesota, World War II Draft Registration Cards,1940-1947      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2759155); 693,535 indexed records with 693,535 record images, ADDED 16 Aug 2019

Nebraska, World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1940-1945      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2759156); 310,174 indexed records with 310,174 record images, ADDED 15 Aug 2019

Utah, World War II Draft Registration Cards,1940-1947   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2659402); 144,519 indexed records with 144,519 record images, ADDED 15 Aug 2019

West Virginia, World War II Draft Registration Cards,1940-1945  (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2659405); 521,022 indexed records with 521,022 record images, ADDED 15 Aug 2019

Virginia, World War II Draft Registration Cards,1940-1945       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2659404); 762,434 indexed records with 762,434 record images, ADDED 15 Aug 2019

*  Wyoming, World War II Draft Registration Cards,1940-1945        (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2659406); 66,012 indexed records with 66,012 record images, ADDED 15 Aug 2019

Oklahoma, World War II Draft Registration Cards,1940-1945       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2710650); 604,280 indexed records with 604,280 record images, ADDED 16 Aug 2019

North Carolina, Church Records, 1700-1970       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2790262); 70,086 indexed records with 70,086 record images, ADDED 12 Aug 2019

— Collections Updated —

Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898  (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1473000); Index only (36,870,759 records), no images (was 36,870,759 records with 0 images), Updated 15 Aug 2019

Belgium, Antwerp, Civil Registration, 1588-1913 (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2138481); 369,246 indexed records with 3,208,805 record images (was 369,266 records with 3,208,805 images), Updated 12 Aug 2019

*  Maine, Kennebec County, Togus National Cemetery Records (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/3246495); 4,428 indexed records with 4,427 record images (was 2,614 records with 2,614 images), Updated 16 Aug 2019

Peru, Cemetery Records, 1912-2013       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/3163400); 97,083 indexed records with 2,624 record images (was 87,828 records with 2,428 images), Updated 17 Aug 2019

Brazil, São Paulo, Civil Registration, 1925-1995        (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2765317); 2,055,765 indexed records with 2,009,803 record images (was 2,055,765 records with 2,009,803 images), Updated 16 Aug 2019

Brazil, Rio de Janeiro, Civil Registration, 1829-2012   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1582573); 5,802,173 indexed records with 5,100,470 record images (was 5,802,173 records with 5,100,470 images), Updated 14 Aug 2019

*  South Carolina, Charleston County, Charleston, Birth Registers, 1901-1926       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2834217); 13,419 indexed records with 875 record images (was 10,497 records with 691 images), Updated 17 Aug 2019

Canada, Prairie Provinces Census, 1926  (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/3005862); 2,073,271 indexed records with 48,436 record images (was 2,016,404 records with 48,436 images), Updated 13 Aug 2019

United States Deceased Physician File (AMA), 1864-1968  (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2061540); 282,068 indexed records with 707,724 record images (was 250,206 records with 707,724 images), Updated 17 Aug 2019

United States, GenealogyBank Obituaries, 1980-2014      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2333694); 34,153,317 indexed records with 46,885,712 record images (was 34,153,318 records with 46,885,712 images), Updated 16 Aug 2019

France, Finistère, Quimper et Léon Diocese, Catholic Parish Records, 1772-1894  (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1636101); 157,759 indexed records with 11,775 record images (was 155,473 records with 11,775 images), Updated 13 Aug 2019

England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1473014); Index only (68,876,243 records), no images (was 68,876,243 records with 0 images), Updated 15 Aug 2019

Nova Scotia Births, 1864-1877   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2243378); 218,765 indexed records with 35,026 record images (was 218,724 records with 35,026 images), Updated 11 Aug 2019

United States, GenealogyBank Historical Newspaper Obituaries, 1815-2011 (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2860782); 22 indexed records with 8 record images (was 22 records with 8 images), Updated 14 Aug 2019

Pennsylvania, Eastern District Petitions for Naturalization, 1795-1931  (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1913395); 452,057 indexed records with 326,903 record images (was 272,790 records with 326,903 images), Updated 16 Aug 2019

California, County Birth and Death Records, 1800-1994   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2001287); 5,441,340 indexed records with 2,915,415 record images (was 5,432,501 records with 2,915,415 images), Updated 13 Aug 2019

England, Warwickshire, Parish Registers, 1535-1963      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1462403); 2,900,841 indexed records with 113,093 record images (was 2,852,294 records with 113,093 images), Updated 12 Aug 2019

*  South Africa, Dutch Reformed Church Records (Stellenbosch Archive), 1690-2011   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1392488); 40,312 indexed records with 496,315 record images (was 40,066 records with 496,315 images), Updated 16 Aug 2019

Illinois, County Naturalization Records, 1800-1998      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1989159); 1,057,736 indexed records with 144,834 record images (was 1,057,736 records with 144,834 images), Updated 16 Aug 2019

Germany, Prussia, Westphalia, Minden, Miscellaneous Collections from the Municipal Archives, 1574-1912  (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1646446); 110,280 indexed records with 7,654 record images (was 110,280 records with 7,654 images), Updated 15 Aug 2019

Nova Scotia Marriages, 1864-1918        (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2242886); 175,518 indexed records with 21,950 record images (was 175,429 records with 21,950 images), Updated 14 Aug 2019

England, Herefordshire Bishop’s Transcripts, 1583-1898  (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/3155913); 1,041,995 indexed records with 87,092 record images (was 1,041,911 records with 87,090 images), Updated 15 Aug 2019

*  Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh, Allegheny Cemetery Records, 1845 – 1960       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/3155912); 157,668 indexed records with 37,808 record images (was 99,542 records with 2,748 images), Updated 17 Aug 2019

Nova Scotia Deaths, 1864-1877   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2242825); 8,468 indexed records with 27,717 record images (was 8,268 records with 27,717 images), Updated 16 Aug 2019

Brazil, Paraná, Civil Registration, 1852-1996   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2016194); Browse 1,689,031 Images only, no index (was 0 records with 1,689,031 images), Updated 14 Aug 2019

Massachusetts, Town Clerk, Vital and Town Records, 1626-2001    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2061550); 3,028,788 indexed records with 1,962,488 record images (was 3,027,876 records with 1,962,488 images), Updated 15 Aug 2019

— Collections with new images —

Florida Deaths, 1877-1939       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1595003); 471,799 indexed records with 471,267 record images (was 471,799 records with 471,266 images),  8 Aug 2019

Arizona, Yavapai County, Pioneers’ Home Resident Ledger and Index, 1911-2000    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/3031544); 2,834 indexed records with 406 record images (was 2,834 records with 401 images),  28 Jun 2019

England, Hampshire Parish Registers, 1538-1980  (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2556014); 2,324,728 indexed records with 173,076 record images (was 2,324,728 records with 165,592 images),  21 May 2019

*  Maine, State Archives, World War I (WWI) Grave Cards, 1914-1950 (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2968248); 4,061 indexed records with 4,067 record images (was 4,061 records with 4,062 images),  22 Mar 2019

Germany, Lutheran Baptisms, Marriages, and Burials, 1500-1971   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/3015626); 3,503,512 indexed records with 8,049,949 record images (was 3,503,512 records with 8,035,541 images),  14 Mar 2019

*  South Africa, Pietermaritzburg Estate Files 1846-1950   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2573604); 439,965 indexed records with 316,352 record images (was 439,965 records with 316,083 images),  3 May 2019

Uruguay, Civil Registration Index Card, 1900-1937       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1976089); 2,403,927 indexed records with 639,347 record images (was 2,403,927 records with 639,125 images),  10 Jan 2019

Kentucky Death Records, 1911-1965       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1417491); 1,678,119 indexed records with 1,676,655 record images (was 1,678,119 records with 1,675,624 images),  16 Mar 2019

United States, Native American, Census Rolls, 1885-1940 (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2761958); 2,220,670 indexed records with 137,615 record images (was 2,220,670 records with 137,423 images),  31 Jan 2019

South Africa, Orange Free State, Probate Records from the Master of the Supreme Court, 1832-1989        (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/3040532); 459,453 indexed records with 60,174 record images (was 459,453 records with 59,446 images),  26 Jun 2019

— Collections with images removed —

Spain, Aragón, Electoral Censuses, 1890-1934    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2304578); 4,972,408 indexed records with 25,885 record images (was 4,972,408 records with 42,540 images),  4 Jun 2019

France, Dordogne, Church and Civil Registration, 1540-1896      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2796817); 7,882,907 indexed records with 3,098,316 record images (was 7,882,907 records with 3,099,653 images),  28 Mar 2018

Germany, Rhineland, Diocese of Trier, Catholic Church Records, 1704-1957        (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2790268); 903,219 indexed records with 76,064 record images (was 903,219 records with 84,174 images),  12 Jan 2019

Georgia, World War I, Statement of Service Cards,  1920-1929    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/3010041); 106,582 indexed records with 106,176 record images (was 106,582 records with 106,271 images),  26 Mar 2019

*  Oregon Deaths, 1842-1952 and Delayed Births, 1844-1914  (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2352707); 90,290 indexed records with 113,499 record images (was 90,290 records with 114,661 images),  25 Oct 2016

South Africa, Transvaal, Civil Marriages, 1870-1930     (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2727134); 253,685 indexed records with 253,446 record images (was 253,685 records with 253,519 images),  10 Apr 2019

— Collections with records removed —

Washington Divorce Index, 1969-2014     (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2759158); Index only (1,236,868 records), no images (was 1,236,869 records with 0 images),  21 Aug 2017

Washington, County Marriages, 1855-2008 (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1534448); 3,835,070 indexed records with 828,877 record images (was 3,835,071 records with 828,877 images),  28 Nov 2018

North Dakota, County Marriages, 1872-1958       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2550852); 111,654 indexed records with 91,457 record images (was 143,951 records with 91,457 images),  29 Nov 2018

England and Wales Birth Registration Index, 1837-2008   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2285338); Index only (132,174,284 records), no images (was 132,174,285 records with 0 images),  2 Oct 2014

===========================================

In order to select a specific record collection on FamilySearch, go to  https://familysearch.org/search/collection/list and use the “Filter by collection name” feature in the upper left-hand corner and use keywords (e.g. “church england”) to find collections with those keywords.

My friend, Marshall, has come up with a way to determine which collections are ADDED, DELETED or UPDATED.  Thanks to Marshall for helping me out here!

Each one of the collections listed above has a Research Wiki page (use the “Learn more” link).  It would be very useful if the Wiki page for each collection listed the dates for when the collection was added as a new collection and the dates for major updates also.

=============================================

The URL for this post is:  


Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the “Comments” link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


Genealogy News Bytes – 16 August 2019

Some of the genealogy news and education items across my monitor the last three days include:

1)  News Articles:


Ancestry.com Owners Aim to Extract $900 Million Payout With Loan





2)  New or Updated Record Collections:




*   Upcoming Family Tree Webinar – Tuesday, 20 August, 5 p.m. PDT:  Ten Tools for Genealogical Writing, by Harold Henderson

*   Upcoming Family Tree Webinar – Wednesday, 21 August, 3 a.m. PDT:  MyHeritage DNA – Ein Überblick (German), by Silvia de Silva
*   Upcoming Family Tree Webinar – Wednesday, 21 August, 11 a.m. PDT:  Bullet Journaling for Genealogy, by Shellee Morehead
*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  MyHeritage-palvelut; sukupuu, SuperSearch ja DNA (Finnish), by Juha Vuorela

*   Archived Family Tree Webinar:  Basics of Land Platting – Part 1, by J. Mark Lowe

*   Archived Family Tree Webinar:  Basics of Land Platting – Part 2, by J. Mark Lowe
4)  Genealogy Education – Podcasts:

*  Fisher’s Top Tips:  #97 – Connecting




5)  Genealogy Videos (YouTube):








*  Family History Ron:  Family History Ron Q&A 15 Aug 2019


*  Genealogy Magazine:  Episode 9: The Private Family Tree


6)  Genealogy Bargains:



7)  Did you miss the last Genealogy News Bytes – 13 August 2019?

==============================================


Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the “Comments” link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Recently Added and Updated Collections on Ancestry.com

From the Ancestry.com list of recent additions at https://www.ancestry.com/cs/recent-collections:

Looking into a Busy Tavern

In a discussion with Kurt Manwaring, Vaughan Scribner described his book Inn Civility: Urban Taverns and Early American Civil Society and offered this word picture of Henry Wetherburn’s tavern in Williamsburg, Virginia (shown above in its current form):

I especially like this tavern because of its diversity—it had the “Bullhead Room” for elites, the “Middle Room” for the middling sorts, and the “Great Room” for mixed companies (mostly the lower classes).

From the historical record, an ordinary evening would include a group of elitist colonists locking themselves in the Bullhead Room for a club. They would probably say this club is erudite and exclusive, but by late in the evening this group of men would probably be drunk and disorderly, spilling out into the Great Room for bumpers and sociability.

In the Great Room, meanwhile, a diverse set of ordinary colonists would have crowded the bar, asking for sloshing bowls of rum punch and tankards of local ale.

There probably would have been a fiddler in one corner, while in another corner a group of slaves waited for their masters to finish in the Bullhead Room or Middle Room.

Wetherburn’s female servants would have flitted among the male crowd, yelling back at them and telling them how it was.

Like colonial American society, tavern interactions were confused and complicated, resting upon ad-hoc communications more than established notions of hierarchy and order.

Scribner argues that in the eighteenth century taverns “were basically the internet, bank, hotel, restaurant, bar, auto-repair shop, brothel, and library all in one.”

Announcing: DearMYRTLE’s new blog "Myrt’s Musings"

DearREADERS,

Yup! I’ve taken the plunge and designed a new blog called Myrt’s Musings. It will include all the news, hangouts announcements and opinionated moderating my DearREADERS have come to expect.

So head on over to


Frankly, I’ve had a ball experimenting with Wordpress. After consulting with 3 experts, we realize its impossible to import my old DearMYRTLE’s Genealogy Blog posts over without a ton of broken links. It had something to do with a custom domain redirect. Yikes!


Yes, I love Blogger, but I’m loving Wordpress, too. 

That sounds like a line from a country western song.


P.S. Genea-friend and fellow GeneaBloggerTRIBE member Randy Seaver of Genea-Musings said it’s ok if Ol’ Myrt here uses the word “musings.” I’m guessing he doesn’t have a copyright on the use of that word.

P. P. S. – I’ve got a whole new color scheme. Wonder if that means I’ll need to make a new quilt backdrop for our upcoming hangouts? Hmmmm.

Happy family tree climbing!

Hangouts: Pay what you want. So it’s simple. If you value the work Ol’ Myrt, +Cousin Russ and our beloved panelists do week in and week out on your behalf, please:

Check the DearMYRTLE Hangouts Calendar for upcoming study groups and hangouts. There you’ll find links to the GeneaConference (in-person) and the GeneaWebinars Calendar with over over 200 hours of online genealogy classes, webinars, live streams and
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Norman Miller, Wilmington Daily Record, Google Chrome, More: Tuesday Afternoon ResearchBuzz, August 6, 2019

NEW RESOURCES

University of Wisconsin-Madison: New Online Archive For Africanist Norman Miller. “The Norman Miller Archive is a new open multimedia resource featuring selected research, photos, films, journals, books, and field notes from the library of Norman Miller, an academic researcher, journalist, and film producer who worked extensively in East Africa from 1960-2015.”

TWEAKS AND UPDATES

DigitalNC: The Daily Record Project: “Remnants” of a Pivotal Paper in North Carolina’s History. “About two years ago, we had the honor of hosting a group of students from Wilmington who were studying one of the most politically and socially devastating moments in the state’s history–the Wilmington Coup and Race Riots of 1898. Their efforts centered around locating and studying the remaining issues of the newspaper at the center of that event, the Wilmington Daily Record. Owned and operated by African Americans, this successful paper incited racists who were already upset with the political power held by African Americans and supporters of equality. During the Coup, the Record’s offices were burned and many were killed. Thanks to these students, their mentors, and cultural heritage institutions, you can now see the seven known remaining issues of the Daily Record on DigitalNC.”

The Register: Googlers hate it! This one weird trick lets websites dodge Chrome 76’s defenses, detect you’re in Incognito mode . “A week ago, Google released Chrome 76, which included a change intended to prevent websites from detecting when browser users have activated Incognito mode. Unfortunately, the web giant’s fix opened another hole elsewhere. It enabled a timing attack that can be used to infer when people are using Incognito mode.”

AROUND THE SEARCH AND SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

CNBC: How Facebook failed to break into hardware: The untold story of Building 8. “Building 8′s experience highlights Facebook’s central quandary as it seeks to diversify beyond mobile ads, which account for 93% of revenue, and expand into the costly business of developing, manufacturing and selling consumer devices. Coding is Facebook’s DNA, but the company’s hacker culture clashes with the realities of hardware development, which demands longer time horizons and relationships with a wide swath of manufacturers and resellers, all issues well beyond Facebook’s core.”

The Atlantic: Where Everyone’s an Influencer. “The occasion was Instabeach, an exclusive, invite-only annual party hosted by the photo-sharing platform for 500 top creators along with plus-ones, talent representatives, managers, and—for the first time—press. The goal, according to Justin Antony, Instagram’s head of creators and emerging talent partnerships, is to help influencers meet one another, mingle, and form friendships. But what started three years ago as a casual beach party for a class of people that was once maligned by the traditional entertainment industry has become a who’s who of young Hollywood, a sun-soaked declaration of just how completely enmeshed Instagram has become with the teen-entertainment world.”

TechCrunch: Facebook still full of groups trading fake reviews, says consumer group. “Which? says it found more than 55,000 new posts across just nine Facebook groups trading fake reviews in July, which it said were generating hundreds ‘or even thousands’ of posts per day. It points out the true figure is likely to be higher because Facebook caps the number of posts it quantifies at 10,000 (and three of the ten groups had hit that ceiling).”

SECURITY & LEGAL

ZDNet: Microsoft: Russian state hackers are using IoT devices to breach enterprise networks. “One of Russia’s elite state-sponsored hacking groups is going after IoT devices as a way to breach corporate networks, from where they pivot to other more high-value targets. Attacks have been observed in the wild said the Microsoft Threat Intelligence Center, one of the OS maker’s cyber-security divisions.”

New York Times: Legal Shield for Websites Rattles Under Onslaught of Hate Speech. “When the most consequential law governing speech on the internet was created in 1996, Google.com didn’t exist and Mark Zuckerberg was 11 years old. The federal law, Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, has helped Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and countless other internet companies flourish.”

RESEARCH & OPINION

TechXplore: Study explores interactions between world leaders on social media. “Researchers at the University of Southern California (USC) have recently carried out a study investigating the interactions among different world leaders and influential political figures on social media. Their findings, pre-published on arXiv, provide interesting new insight about how government actors use social media, which could help to better understand the role of new technologies in diplomatic exchanges.”

Cornell Chronicle: Study finds racial bias in tweets flagged as hate speech. “Tweets believed to be written by African Americans are much more likely to be tagged as hate speech than tweets associated with whites, according to a Cornell study analyzing five collections of Twitter data marked for abusive language.” Good afternoon, Internet…

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