My Kindle Books

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Welcome to Southwest Virginia Genealogy .com

Hi guys.All the books are back again. My brother has taken them over. Sorry that it took so long.

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Welcome.

This is the website for all things about Southwest Virginia Genealogy.

As most people know this is an important melting pot area for people to have met and married in the expansion of America. The Scott County area is famous for the Wilderness Road and most families had to travel through here to go to other parts of the country. This are has a natural gap that let people travel trhough the mountains.

From this a lot of people met for the first time and married and then spread out all over the country.

I have started a series of books that are available on Amazon as electronic books, or ebooks. These books can be viewed on Kindle, your computer, and other book reading devices. View the books page for more information.

I am unable to provide you with my actual books here due to my agreement with Kindle. You will need to go there and purchase. I do have other files that you can access here that are about some of my immediate family and the paid section has some other information.

If I can be of any service you can email me at charles_osborne@hotmail.com.

Myrt’s got CC

DearREADERS,
It is a red letter day over at DearMYRTLE. We announced something marvelous during today’s Mondays with Myrt Zoom Webinar. We are adding live closed captioning to our webinars. 

As our regulars know, DearMYRTLE webinars are all about conversation

  • We have a cadre of opinionated panelists from throughout the world. 
  • Cousin Russ spotlights attendees’ comments. 
  • We focus on diversity and inclusion, excited to learn new things together.
  • We don’t have lectures per se, but we enjoy informative conversation.

It takes a village of genealogists to decipher the GPS and improve our citations. Virtual meetings have been a Godsend for Ol’ Myrt here since this wheelchair is my nearly constant companion. But there is one segment of the greater genealogy community that cannot actively participate. We are going to fix that starting this week – as we are adding *live* closed captioning to our webinars. 

Yup! “Myrt’s got CC!”

By Wednesday, each panelist will be set up to participate, so that our Zoom API can tell our 3rd party service to automatically transcribe his voice to text during our live meetings. All attendees may view the CC – closed captions, as well as the transcript. 

Finally, our Deaf associates can share in the learning, share in the teaching, and revel in the camaraderie like never before. How cool is that?

Here’s what it will look like:

IMAGE: Our Zoom Webinar participants  may click the CC button
and the text will show up as shown in the screen shot above.
 

Watch the first few minutes of today’s Mondays with Myrt for the explanation of how this new CC option will work.

You will note that the CC worked today for only what Cousin Russ and DearMYRTLE said, because we have not yet activated this option with our other panelists. By this week’s WACKY Wednesday, all panelists will be part of the CC.

Click here to view the embedded video on YouTube, where you may turn on YouTube’s CC.
I’m thrilled that we can offer CC for our attendees from this point on. YAY!

REGISTRATION
Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     🙂
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE

Second Life: Clarise Beaumont

http://www.facebook.com/groups/DearMYRTLE
https://www.facebook.com/groups/organizedgenealogist

Free At-Home Education Resources From Ancestry® and Access to Nearly 500M National Archives Records

Ancestry® is a family and a community, even when we’re not together – which is why we will be sharing resources for people at home. For nearly a decade, Ancestry® has been offering its AncestryK12® services, a no-cost program for K-12 schools and teachers in classrooms nationwide that includes access to content from the U.S. Read More

The post Free At-Home Education Resources From Ancestry® and Access to Nearly 500M National Archives Records appeared first on Ancestry Blog.

Darned Undertaking

We depend upon records to reveal the “truth” about the past. Yet sometimes records have anomalies. Some are amusing or humorous. Some are interesting or weird. Some are peculiar or suspicious. Some are infuriating, or downright laughable. Records say the darnedest things!

Kenneth H. Rich was the undertaker. He was also the decedent. Weird.

Kenneth H. Rich of Kokomo, Indiana was his own undertaker.

After 30 years as an undertaker, Kenneth retired just 7 weeks before his doctor started treating him for interstitial nephritis. Less than 6 weeks later, Kenneth was gone. His son, Robert, took over the family business. Six years after his father’s passing, Robert had his first born son. He named him Kenneth.

Reader Naomi Martineau shared this record with me. Thanks, Naomi!

Image credit: Ancestry.com.

“Roots Less Traveled”, a new television series co-produced by Ancestry® to debut on NBC April 4

We’re excited to announce we have a new television show debuting on NBC which features real people and their personal discoveries! From the comfort of your own couch, you can tag along each week as Roots Less Traveled follows a pair of family members​ who bond over their joint quest to learn more about their Read More

The post “Roots Less Traveled”, a new television series co-produced by Ancestry® to debut on NBC April 4 appeared first on Ancestry Blog.

Monday Genea-Pourri – Week Ending 25 May 2020

Here are the highlights of my family history and genealogy related activities over the past week:

1)  Moderated and hosted the Chula Vista Genealogical Society DNA Interest Group meeting on Wednesday, 20 May in a Zoom meeting, with 12 in attendance.  I discussed the new AncestryDNA Tree icons and the changed DNA Match screen with a ThruLine; the MyHeritageDNA Theory of Family Relativity update, along with how I write Notes and use the chromosome browser; the CeCe Moore TV show on 26 May; ethnicity estimates and communicating with AncestryDNA matches.  In the second hour, the attendees discussed their challenges and successes.

2)  Participated in the San Diego Genelaogical Society DNA Interest Group Zoom meeting on Saturday, 23 May.  Colin made two presentations – an Overview of recent DNA features, and on GEDmatch.
3)  Participated in today’s Mondays With Myrt on Zoom.  We learned how to set up the Closed Captioning using Streamer and tested it out.  

4)  Watched the Family Tree Webinar Fridays in May: Your Questions Answered LIVE—More DNA with Diahan” by Diahan Southard.

5)  Wrote and posted a biographical sketch of 7th great-grandfather #542 George Stearns  (1688-1760) for my 52 Ancestors biographical sketch on Friday.  

6)  Transcribed the 1783 Will of Nathan Brigham (1693-1784) of Southborough, Mass. for Amanuensis Monday.  

7)  Continued sorting out the Seaver families in Philadelphia in the 1850-1900 time frame.  Wrote a series of blog posts about some of them.  Added events and sources to many of them with Ancestry Hints.

8)  Added Notes to about 26 more AncestryDNA matches with cM values, relationships and known common ancestors.  Added one AncestryDNA ThruLine to the RootsMagic family tree database.  Reviewed new DNA matches on AncestryDNA, MyHeritageDNA, FamilyTreeDNA and 23andMe.  

9) There were several sessions working in the RootsMagic software program to match with and update FamilySearch Family Tree profiles for Seaver families and my ancestral families, with occasional additions to the RootsMagic profiles. I have matched 35,807 of my RootsMagic persons with FamilySearch Family Tree profiles (up 134).

10)  Used Web Hints and Record Matches from Ancestry, MyHeritage, Findmypast and FamilySearch to add content and sources to my RootsMagic profiles.  I now have 57,656 persons in my RootsMagic file (up 148) , and 121,180 source citations (up 579).   I TreeShared with my Ancestry Member Tree two times this week updating 341 profiles, and I resolved 881 Ancestry Hints.  I’ve fallen behind on the Ancestry Record Hints with 131,309 to be resolved, but I work on them almost daily.    

11)  Updated my presentation on “Using Collaborative ‘BIG’ Family Trees” for the CVGS program on Wednesday in a Zoom meeting.

12)  Wrote 20 Genea-Musings blog posts last week, of which two were a press release.  The most popular post last week was Did Sarah Giberson Marry Two Seaver Men? – Part I with over 458 views.  

13)  We are still fine here at the Genea-cave, hunkered down and not going out much.  I went to the grocery store on Tuesday and Friday and it wasn’t too busy.  I picked some weeds and am still thinking about mowing the back yard again.  I pushed Linda in the wheelchair up and down the block on Sunday.We watched the church choir and pastor’s sermon on YouTube on Sunday.  Other than that, it was stay-at-home on the computer doing genealogy, eating and sleeping, plus reading ebooks on my laptop while watching TV.

                              =============================================


The URL for this post is:  
https://www.geneamusings.com/2020/05/monday-genea-pourri-week-ending-25-may.html

Copyright (c) 2020, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the “Comments” link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Arming America: How “the Controversy Arose”

As I described yesterday, in 2002 Emory University asked three outside scholars to investigate charges of “failures of scholarly care and integrity” against Michael Bellesiles, author of Arming America.

Those scholars were academic heavyweights: Stanley N. Katz of Princeton, Hanna H. Gray of the University of Chicago, and Laurel Thatcher Ulrich of Harvard. They had the assistance of a graduate student who visited archives in Massachusetts, checked other sources, and reran calculations.

That committee filed their report (P.D.F. download) in July. Emory University released it in October. On the same day, Bellesiles resigned.

In his interview last year with Daniel Gullotta for the Age of Jackson podcast, Bellesiles made some comments about that report and other criticism of his book. I decided to assess those remarks against the historical record.

Bellesiles told Gullotta:

The controversy arose because seventeen years ago, there was a flood in Bowden Hall at Emory University in Atlanta, which severely damaged the offices of numerous professors in the history and philosophy departments, including mine. Most of the original notes for my book Arming America were destroyed in that flood. And within days, opponents of the book picked up on this loss to argue that I had never conducted the research supporting three paragraphs in the book that concern probate records.

The sprinkler-pipe flood happened in April 2000, nineteen (not seventeen) years before this conversation. Arming America was published in early September 2000, so “opponents of the book” couldn’t have responded to the flood “within days” because the book didn’t yet exist. But of course we may not recall exact details of a difficult time.

Here’s the sequence of events as best I can recreate it. Bellesiles published a paper on gun ownership in early America in the Journal of American History in 1996. Its evidence included travel accounts and probate inventories. Clayton E. Cramer, a graduate student with whom Bellesiles had corresponded about gun laws, then wrote to the journal listing other travel accounts that contradicted the paper’s findings. Bellesiles replied by dismissing Cramer’s criticism as politically motivated.

Meanwhile, Bellesiles had agreed with the Knopf division of Random House to publish what became Arming America. The July 1999 Economist reported on the upcoming book. In December, Charlton Heston, president of the National Rifle Association, sniped at Bellesiles’s work. The editing and production process on the book must have also begun in 1999. That sprinkler pipe burst in April 2000, making news only in the Emory community. In that same month, the New York Times reported on Bellesiles’s intriguing conclusions.

Arming America was officially published in September 2000, receiving prominent and mostly positive reviews in the mainstream press. As early as 30 August, Prof. James Lindgren of Northwestern University wrote to Bellesiles with questions about his research since he’d been working on the same questions using probate inventories. On 19 September, Bellesiles sent Lindgren an email saying, among other things, that the office flood had destroyed his notes. That appears to have been the first link between the burst pipe and the probate data, and it came from Bellesiles himself. (Subsequently, the Emory committee found, Bellesiles made a “disavowal” of some other statements in those 30 August and 19 September emails to Lindgren.)

The first public mention of that flood’s effect on the debate that I’ve found was a draft of Lindgren and Justin Lee Heather’s essay “Counting Guns in Early America” dated 28 December. Some critics of the book were indeed skeptical of Bellesiles’s explanation about the loss of his probate data—some had to be convinced there even was an office flood. But Lindgren and others accepted, if only for argument, that Bellesiles had indeed counted probate records on yellow pads as he described and included that in their analyses of his work. That was sloppy technique and the numbers still didn’t add up, they said.

But that aspect of the book wasn’t where the “controversy arose” first. Cramer had objected to Bellesiles’s conclusions back in 1997. After the book appeared, Cramer expanded on his criticism, finding more omitted and distorted sources. As a software engineer, he used his expertise with computers to set up webpages sharing those findings. Unfortunately for the appearance of political leanings, Cramer located his pages within the website of the Golden Gate United National Rifle Association, making it easy for Bellesiles and his defenders to dismiss the complaints.

Cramer, as a graduate student in California, didn’t have the resources to try to replicate most of Bellesiles’s probate research in the east. But he found plenty of other details in Arming America to criticize. Lindgren and his team had already worked in some of those probate archives, so they could analyze what data Bellesiles reported and find discrepancies. Eventually formal reviews in scholarly journals voiced more doubts, though most didn’t appear until late 2001 or 2002, after Arming America had received the Bancroft Prize.

I’ve always been struck by how Lindgren’s critique carried much more weight than Cramer’s. According to Bellesiles in his interview with Gullotta:

Now, I think the reason they picked on the probate records is because those are the most obscure of all the materials I use, that pretty much require you to go to the individual archives in order to examine them. It’s not something that could easily be verified by going to a good research university library.

Except that Cramer found a lot wrong with Arming America by “going to a good research university library.” Bellesiles’s ongoing emphasis on the book’s small section about probate inventories gives the false impression that no one had found other problems with the book.

There are better explanations of why Lindgren’s criticism got more traction within the academic world than Cramer’s. Lindgren was a professor at Northwestern. Cramer was a graduate student at Sonoma State University. Lindgren wasn’t a proponent of gun ownership in contemporary America while Cramer was. Lindgren’s argument rested mostly (but not wholly) on numbers. Cramer’s critique was largely about words, which can seem more open to interpretation. But isn’t quoting words out of context just as inaccurate as reporting a false count of wills?

Whatever the reason, we can see that Emory University gave more weight to the Lindgren critique. All five of the questions it tasked the outside committee with examining involved “probate records” of some sort. Furthermore, the committee noted that its mandate covered “ONLY” those questions. (In Appendix B, Part 3, the research assistant did address discrepancies with travel narratives that Lindgren had noted, but disagreed with parts of his assessment.)

TOMORROW: Bellesiles’s comments on the committee’s conclusions.

Long Live the 25th March, 1821

New Free Historical Records on FamilySearch: Week of 18 May 2020

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:

FamilySearch added 7 million new land, obituary, death, and divorce records this week to United States collections. Additional indexed records and images were added for American Samoa, Argentina, Austria, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Dominican Republic, England, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Niue, Peru,Puerto Rico, South Africa, Sweden, and Venezuela. Other United States records were added for AZ, CA, GA, IA, ID, LA, ME, MI, MO, MT, NC, NE, NM, NY, OKOH, ORPA, UT, VAand WI. 

Search these new records and images by clicking on the collection links below, or go to FamilySearch to search over 8 billion free names and record images.

Country Collection Indexed Records Digital Images Comments
American Samoa American Samoa, Vital Records, 1850-1930 1,587 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection (Some Restrictions Apply)
Argentina Argentina, Santa Fe, Catholic Church Records, 1634-1975 4,163 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Austria Austria, Vienna, Jewish Registers of Births, Marriages, and Deaths, 1784-1911 27,317 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Brazil Brazil, Bahia, Civil Registration, 1877-1976 216 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Brazil Brazil, Minas Gerais, Civil Registration, 1879-1949 3,341 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Brazil Brazil, Santa Catarina, Civil Registration, 1850-1999 6,447 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Canada Canada, New Brunswick, County Register of Births, 1801-1920 3,805 0 New indexed records collection
Canada Nova Scotia Deaths, 1864-1877 44 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Chile Chile, Catholic Church Records, 1710-1928 8,575 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Chile Chile, Cemetery Records, 1821-2015 87,220 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Dominican Republic Dominican Republic Miscellaneous Records, 1921-1980 43,564 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
England England, Derbyshire, Church of England Parish Registers, 1537-1918 23,084 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
England England, Devon, Plymouth Prison Records, 1821-1919 13,495 0 New indexed records collection
England England, Essex Parish Registers, 1538-1997 2,540 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
England England, Gloucestershire Non-Conformist Church Records, 1642-1996 32,012 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection (Some Restrictions Apply)
England England, Northumberland Non-Conformist Church Records, 1613-1920 50,490 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
England England, Yorkshire Marriage Bonds and Allegations, 1613-1887 15,961 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Germany Germany, Baden, Church Book Duplicates, 1804-1877 43,378 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Germany Germany, Saxony, Church Book Indexes, 1500-1900 32,709 0 New indexed records collection
Ireland Ireland, John Watson Stewart, The Gentlemen’s and Citizen’s Almanac, 1814 17,266 0 New indexed records collection
Italy Italy, Benevento, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1810-1942 155,594 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Italy Italy, Brescia, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1797-1943 78,275 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Italy Italy, Salerno, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1806-1949 32,447 31,969 Added images and indexed records to an existing collection
Niue Niue, Vital Records, 1818-1994 6,939 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Norway Norway, Oslo, Akershus Prison Records, 1844-1885 808 0 New indexed records collection
Peru Peru, Ayacucho, Civil Registration, 1903-1999 21,552 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Peru Peru, Diocese of Huacho, Catholic Church Records, 1560-1952 260,438 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Peru Peru, Huánuco, Civil Registration, 1888-1998 43,196 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Peru Peru, Municipal Census, 1831-1866 2,188 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Peru Peru, Piura, Civil Registration, 1874-1996 878 0 New indexed records collection
Peru Peru, Prelature of Yauyos-Cañete-Huarochirí, Catholic Church Records, 1665-2018 8,842 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Puerto Rico Puerto Rico, Civil Registration, 1805-2001 2,202 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
South Africa South Africa, Church of the Province of South Africa, Parish Registers, 1801-2004 3,530 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
South Africa South Africa, Civil Death Registration, 1955-1966 11,402 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
South Africa South Africa, Civil Marriage Records, 1840-1973 25,065 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
South Africa South Africa, KwaZulu Natal, Vital Records, 1868-1976 1,668 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
South Africa South Africa, Natal Province, Civil Deaths, 1863-1955 6,505 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Sweden Sweden, Stockholm City Archives, Index to Church Records, 1546-1927 62,560 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Arizona Deaths, 1870-1951 10,345 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Arizona, Birth Certificates and Indexes, 1855-1930 12,687 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States California, County Birth and Death Records, 1800-1994 31,236 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States California, Geographical and Name Index of Californians who served in WWI, 1914-1918 27,306 0 New indexed records collection
United States California, Los Angeles, Angelus-Rosedale Cemetery/Crematory Records, 1884-2002 2,114 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States California, Los Angeles, San Gabriel Cemetery Association, Cemetery Index 1872-2003 162 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States California, San Mateo County, Colma, Italian Cemetery Records, 1899-2011 24,576 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States District of Columbia Deaths, 1874-1961 35 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Florida, Fort Lauderdale Crew Lists, 1939-1945 13 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Florida, Pensacola, Passenger Lists, 1900-1945 845 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Georgia, Chatham, Savannah, Laurel Grove Cemetery Record Keeper’s Book (colored), 1852-1942 631 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Georgia, Columbus, Linwood and Porterdale Colored Cemeteries, Interment Records, 1866-2000 2,564 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Hawaii, Hawaiian Islands Newspaper Obituaries, 1900-ca.2010 243 0 New indexed records collection
United States Idaho, Jefferson Star, County Cemetery Records, 1800-2000 79,733 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Iowa, Buchanan County Obituaries and Cemetery Records, ca.1796-1988 47,028 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Louisiana, Orleans Parish Death Records and Certificates, 1835-1954 43,485 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Maine, Alien Arrivals, 1906-1953 199,010 0 New indexed records collection
United States Michigan, Detroit Manifests of Arrivals at the Port of Detroit, 1906-1954 323,121 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Michigan, Saginaw County, Biographical Card File, ca. 1830-2000 1,895 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Minnesota, Hennepin County, Minneapolis, Layman Cemetery Burial Records, 1860-1926 418 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Mississippi, County Marriages, 1858-1979 22,553 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Missouri State and Territorial Census Records, 1732-1933 34,501 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Montana, Silver Bow County, Cemetery Indexes, 1880-2003 5,954 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Nebraska, Lancaster County, Wyuka Cemetery Burial Permits, 1883-1999 1,754 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States New Jersey, Mercer County, Veteran’s Service Office, Grave Registration Records, ca. 1770-ca.1979 92 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States New Mexico Alien Arrivals, 1917-1954 17,240 0 New indexed records collection
United States New York, Southern District, U.S District Court Naturalization Records, 1824-1946 103,000 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States North Carolina, Center for Health Statistics, Vital Records Unit, County Birth Records, 1913-1922 20,874 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States North Carolina, Wilmington, Cemetery Records, 1852-2005 5,836 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Ohio, Toledo, Historic Woodlawn Cemetery Index of Burials, 1877-1955 43,409 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Oklahoma, Tulsa County, Rose Hill Memorial Park Interment Records, ca.1915 – ca.1982 1,204 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Oregon Death Index, 1971-2008 1,063,054 0 New indexed records collection
United States Oregon Divorce Index, 1991-2008 340,289 0 New indexed records collection
United States Pennsylvania Mortality Schedules, 1850-1880 1,205 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Rhode Island, Providence County, Providence, Swan Point Cemetery Records, ca.1846-ca.1950 701 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Texas, Grimes County, Marriage Records, 1951-1966 218 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States United States, GenealogyBank Historical Newspaper Obituaries, 1815-2011 1,827,447 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States United States, New York Land Records, 1630-1975 3,868,777 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Utah, Brigham City Family History Center, Obituary Collection, 1930-2015 10,622 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Virginia, Bureau of Vital Statistics, County Marriage Registers, 1853-1935 5,258 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Holy Cross Cemetery, Interment Records, 1909-1979 12,887 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Venezuela Venezuela, Archdiocese of Valencia, Catholic Church Records, 1760, 1905-2013 306,392 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
About FamilySearch

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 5,000 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Monday Mailbox: Browsing Ancestry Database Images

The Ancestry Insider's Monday MailboxDear Ancestry Insider,

The database “Pennsylvania Wills and Probate Records 1683-1993,” offers the subscriber a “Browse this collection” window which works perfectly for all Pennsylvania counties except for Philadelphia County. The list of available images for Philadelphia County never shows up anymore—it did when the database was first launched. Perhaps because it is such a huge amount of data, it cannot load properly. Because the list of digitized probate files for Philadelphia County can only be accessed by clicking on a link from this “Browse” function (administrations, etc), it is now not possible to access those files since there is no dropdown menu.

If you know someone at Ancestry who could correct this, I know many researchers would be grateful.

With thanks,

Sandi Hewlett

Dear Sandi,

I’ll see what I can do.

In the meantime, there is a workaround. There are two ways to access the browse capability of an Ancestry collection. One is the browse you have identified on the collection page. The other is accessed via the breadcrumb path at the top of the page, underneath the title when viewing an image. If you can find a way to see any image, then you can browse to any other image. You can get to an image via browsing one of the other counties that works, or by searching for a common name. Or do this:

1. Start at https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/8802/005871739_00002.

2. Underneath the collection title at the top of the page, click on “Administration Files, 1764.”

3. Select from the available options.

Signed,

—The Ancestry Insider

Series Premiere Airdate Change: ABC News Presents New Prime-Time Series “The Genetic Detective”

I wrote about this new television series about a month ago at https://bit.ly/362qMiN. However, there has been a change announced since then. Originally slated for a May 19 launch, the series will now roll out on Tuesday, June 2.

The following is a new press release written by ABC News:

ABC NEWS PRESENTS NEW PRIME-TIME SERIES ‘THE GENETIC DETECTIVE’

CeCe Moore

Investigative Genetic Genealogist CeCe Moore Helps Police Uncover a Criminal Suspect’s Identity Through Crime Scene DNA, Research and Revolutionary Technology

Moore Takes on Her First-Ever Cold Case – the Double Homicide of Jay Cook and Tanya Van Cuylenborg – in Series Premiere, Tuesday, May 26 (10:00 – 11:00 p.m. EDT), on ABC [Update: now rescheduled to June 2.]

ABC News presents a new prime-time series, “The Genetic Detective,” that follows investigative genetic genealogist CeCe Moore and her work with DNA technology company Parabon NanoLabs. In the series, Moore and her team are revolutionizing crime solving by working with police departments and accessible crime scene DNA to help trace the path of a criminal suspect’s family tree, uncover their identity and bring them to justice. “The Genetic Detective” premieres Tuesday, May 26 (10:00 – 11:00 p.m. EDT), on ABC. [Update: now rescheduled to June 2.]

For the past decade, Moore, a self-trained genetic genealogist, has pioneered genetic genealogy techniques utilizing a growing body of genetic data in conjunction with traditional genealogical records to help adoptees find their birth parents and to solve family mysteries. Since 2018, Moore has used her unique research skills to transform the face of crime solving, helping to identify more than 100 violent criminal suspects.

“I had a growing passion for genetic genealogy and I recognized its power very early on. Yet at the time, in 2010, there was no such thing as a professional genetic genealogist so I had to blaze my own trail in order to make this my full-time career,” said Moore. “I knew the potential these techniques had for solving mysteries – really, for any type of human identification. Whether it is an adoptee looking to find their birth parents or helping law enforcement track down a potential suspect, this process provides answers in a new way and helps a family move beyond something that’s painful or has been burdening them.”

In the series premiere titled “The Case of the Missing Lovebirds,” Moore works with Seattle’s Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office and takes on her first-ever cold case as a genetic genealogist – the double homicide of Jay Cook and Tanya Van Cuylenborg. The young couple disappeared in 1987 after taking a ferry from Vancouver to Seattle and were later found miles apart, gagged, bound and brutally murdered. With a smattering of clues, but no real leads, the case was cold for 30 years. The episode includes interviews with Jay’s parents, Gordon and Leona Cook; Tanya’s brother, John Van Cuylenborg; Snohomish County law enforcement retired Sheriff Rick Bart and Detective Jim Scharf; and radio reporter Hanna Scott.

“The Genetic Detective” will also examine the murder of 8-year-old April Tinsley with Indiana’s Fort Wayne Police Department; the double homicide of mother and daughter Sherri and Megan Scherer with the New Madrid County Sheriff’s Department in Missouri as well as the murder of Genevieve Zitricki with the Greenville Police Department in South Carolina; the 1996 murder of Angie Dodge with Idaho Falls Police Department in Idaho; the Ramsey Street Rapist with North Carolina’s Fayetteville Police Department; and the 2018 rape of 79-year-old Carla Brooks with Utah’s St. George Police Department.

“The Genetic Detective” is a co-production with ABC News and XCON Productions. Carrie Cook and Marc Dorian serve as co-executive producers for ABC News. Christine Connor is executive producer, and Christopher K. Dillon is co-executive producer for XCON Productions. CeCe Moore is producer.

AIRDATE CHANGE

CECE MOORE CRACKS A 1998 COLD CASE USING GENETIC GENEALOGY TO IDENTIFY THE MURDERER OF MOTHER-DAUGHTER SHERRI AND MEGAN SCHERER ON ‘THE GENETIC DETECTIVE,’ TUESDAY, JUNE 2, ON ABC

“Hunt for the Runaway Killer” – Investigative genetic genealogist CeCe Moore works with the New Madrid County Sheriff’s Department on the 1998 murder of Sherri and Megan Scherer, a mother and daughter from New Madrid, Missouri. As the investigation takes Moore and detectives on a series of unexpected detours across the country, they uncover the identity of a previously unknown serial killer and Moore ends up meeting with the killer’s daughter. The episode features interviews with Steven Scherer, son and brother to the victims; law enforcement from New Madrid and Greenville, South Carolina, and Memphis, Tennessee; the killer’s daughter Deborah Brashers-Claunch; DNA expert Ruth Montgomery; and TV reporter Kathy Sweeney. A new episode of “The Genetic Detective” premieres TUESDAY, JUNE 2 (10:00-11:00 p.m. EDT), on ABC.

“The Genetic Detective” is a co-production with ABC News and XCON Productions. Carrie Cook and Marc Dorian serve as co-executive producers for ABC News. Christine Connor is executive producer, and Christopher K. Dillon is co-executive producer for XCON Productions. CeCe Moore is producer.